Tracks Pdf




Tracks

Number of page: 262
Author: Robyn Davidson
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 9781480452671
Rating:
Category: Travel

The incredible true story of one woman’s solo adventure across the Australian outback, accompanied by her faithful dog and four unpredictable camels For Robyn Davidson, one of these moments comes at age twenty-seven in Alice Springs, a dodgy town at the frontier of the vast Australian desert. Davidson is intent on walking the 1,700 miles of desolate landscape between Alice Springs and the Indian Ocean, a personal pilgrimage with her dog—and four camels. Tracks is the beautifully written, compelling true story of the author’s journey and the love/hate relationships she develops along the way: with the Red Centre of Australia; with aboriginal culture; with a handsome photographer; and especially with her lovable and cranky camels, Bub, Dookie, Goliath, and Zeleika.   Adapted into a critically acclaimed film starring Mia Wasikowska and Adam Driver, Tracks is an unforgettable story that proves that anything is possible. Perfect for fans of Cheryl Strayed’s Wild.  

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Reviews:
  • Backpackguru NagelBackpackguru Nagel
    Enjoyed! Love the National Geographic article, the movie and the book.
  • Bob HawkinsBob Hawkins
    Very interesting An excellent read. And the descriptions of the people she met and the outback were like the work of visual artists
  • siri51siri51
    LibraryThing Review Rereading after many years; amazing story, increidble landscapes and those camels! Davidson’s comment for this edition that sucha journey couldn’t be done now is valid ; it would be all about blogging or tweets, gps devices and even more media attention than she got in 1975.
  • lilibrarianlilibrarian
    LibraryThing Review A 27 year old Australian woman decides to train camels and walk across Australia’s interior with them.
  • ChristineChristine
    Review: Tracks: A Woman’s Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback An interesting book about a young woman’s trek across the western deserts of Australia with 3 camels and a dog.
  • rainpebblerainpebble
    LibraryThing Review Tracks: A Woman’s Solo Trek Across 1700 Miles of Australian Outback by Robyn Davidson; (3 1/2*) I found this memoir to be a wonderful tale of a very courageous young woman’s phenomenal adventure
  • mdorismdoris
    LibraryThing Review This is a great book. It is well written and tells such a personal story of adventure, hardships, scares, determination, self reliance, self discovery and insight. Davidson wrote the book 2 years
  • Cheryl_in_CC_NVCheryl_in_CC_NV
    LibraryThing Review More than a travelogue, more than memoirs. Even though this presents to being more about her than the Bill Bryson I’ve read & only somewhat about the places & people, and camels, it ends up being much
  • gypsysmomgypsysmom
    LibraryThing Review The movie made from this book came out this year. I haven’t seen it yet because I wanted to read the book first. Davidson made the journey that this book covers in 1977 and, as she says in the
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