The Long Way Pdf




The Long Way

Number of page: 256
Author: ernard Moitessier
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781574093377
Rating:
Category: Sports & Recreation

The Long Way is Bernard Moitessier’s own incredible story of his participation in the first Golden Globe Race, a solo, non-stop circumnavigation rounding the three great Capes of Good Hope, Leeuwin, and the Horn. For seven months, the veteran seafarer battled storms, doldrums, gear-failures, knock-downs, as well as overwhelming fatigue and loneliness. Then, nearing the finish, Moitessier pulled out of the race and sailed on for another three months before ending his 37,455-mile journey in Tahiti. Not once had he touched land.

Preview pages:

  • preview 1
  • preview 2
  • preview 3
  • preview 4

About The Author

Bernard Moitessier was born in 1925 in Indochina and much of his sailing knowledge was gained during time spent at sea with the fishermen of the Gulf of Siam. One of the greatest ocean voyagers, he became a legend in his time. He was also a gifted writer and wrote four books describing his seagoing adventures. He moved to France where he spent the last years of his life working on his memoirs, Tamata and the Alliance (Sheridan House, 1995), the story of an unusual man and an exciting life. Bernard Moitessier died in the summer of 1994.

Reviews:

  •  martyb martyb
    LibraryThing Review This book is yet another sailing story and appeals on that basis. The last half of the book feels rushed as compared to the first half. The author never completely tells the full story, in my opinion
  •  martyb martyb
    LibraryThing Review This book is yet another sailing story and appeals on that basis. The last half of the book feels rushed as compared to the first half. The author never completely tells the full story, in my opinion
Similar books:

  • Near Death on the High Seas

    Near Death on the High Seas
    The wind was blowing at hurricane strength sixty five knots and over and increasing in the gusts to eighty knots His boat was surfing on waves as high as a sixty foot six storey building Each wave that struck choked and froze him the icy water working its way down inside his survival suit from Close to the Wind by Pete GossIn Near Death on the High Seas Cecil Kuhne collects some of the most terrifying and astounding experiences of sailors confronting the awesome raw power of the sea These tales filled with everyday heroes and survivors comprise a riveting and often breathtaking collection of extraordinary stories that show the terrible ferocity of the untamable ocean Also featuring Thor Heyerdahl s Kon Tiki the historic and celebrated journey of the Kon Tiki as it journeys across the Pacific Steve Callahan s Adrift a solo sailor loses his boat in the Atlantic must survive in a five foot life raft for 76 days fighting off sharks with a makeshift spear Francis Chischester s Gipsy Moth Circles The World the stirring story of a one man s solo sail around the globe at age 65 John Rousmaniere s Fastnet Force 10 in one of the worst sailing tragedies in history a massive rescue operation takes place amidst sixty knot winds and forty foot breaker waves From the Trade Paperback edition

  • Mischief goes South: Every herring should hang by its own tail

    Mischief goes South: Every herring should hang by its own tail
    No sea voyage can be dull for a man who has an eye for the ever changing sea and sky the waves the wind and the way of a ship upon the water So observes H W Bill Tilman in this account of two lengthy voyages in which dull intervals were few and far between In 1966 after a succession of eventful and successful voyages in the high latitudes of the Arctic Tilman and his pilot cutter Mischief head south again this time with the Antarctic Peninsula Smith Island and the unclimbed Mount Foster in their sights Mischief goes South is an account of a voyage marred by tragedy and dogged by crew trouble from the start Tilman gives ample insight into the difficulties associated with his selection of shipmates and his supervision of a crew as he wryly notes to have four misfits in a crew of five is too many The second part of this volume contains the author s account of a gruelling voyage south an account left unwritten for ten years for lack of time and energy Originally intended as an expedition to the remote Crozet Islands in the southern Indian Ocean this 1957 voyage evolved into a circumnavigation of Africa the unplanned consequence of a momentary lapse in attention by an inexperienced helmsman The two voyages described in Mischief goes South covered 43 000 miles over twenty five months spent at sea and while neither was deemed successful published together they give a fine insight into Tilman s character

  • Mischief among the Penguins: Hand (man) wanted for long voyage in small boat. No pay, no prospects, not much pleasure.

    Mischief among the Penguins: Hand (man) wanted for long voyage in small boat. No pay, no prospects, not much pleasure.
    Hand man wanted for long voyage in small boat No pay no prospects not much pleasure So read the crew notice placed in the personal column of The Times by H W Bill Tilman in the spring of 1959 This approach to selecting volunteers for a year long voyage of 20 000 miles brought mixed seafaring experience Osborne had crossed the Atlantic fifty one times in the Queen Mary playing double bass in the ship s orchestra With unclimbed ice capped peaks and anchorages that could at best be described as challenging the Southern Ocean island groups of Crozet and Kerguelen provided obvious destinations for Tilman and his fifty year old wooden pilot cutter Mischief His previous attempt to land in the Crozet Islands had been abandoned when their only means of landing was carried away by a severe storm in the Southern Ocean Back at Lymington a survey of the ship uncovered serious Teredo worm damage Tilman undeterred sold his car to fund the rebuilding work and began planning his third sailing expedition to the southern hemisphere Mischief among the Penguins 1961 Tilman s account of landfalls on these tiny remote volcanic islands bears testament to the development of his ocean navigation skills and seamanship The accounts of the island anchorages their snow covered heights geology and in particular the flora and fauna pay tribute to the varied interests and ingenuity of Mischief s crew not least after several months at sea when food supplies needed to be eked out Tilman s writing style rich with informative and entertaining quotations highlights the lessons learned with typical self deprecating humour while playing down the immensity of his achievements

  • Schooner to the Southern Oceans: The Captain James Cook Bicentenary Voyage 1776-1976

    Schooner to the Southern Oceans: The Captain James Cook Bicentenary Voyage 1776-1976
    Gordon Cook set out from Plymouth with his wife Mary and their two very young children Sue and Jon to repeat the third and last voyage that Captain James Cook made in 1776 The bicentenaries of Captain Cook s first two voyages in 1963 and 1969 had both passed with little or nothing to celebrate them despite huge fund raising efforts When both of these bicentenary events ended in failure Gordon vowed to sail in his own ship and repeat Captain Cook s final voyage 200 years later in 1976 He did just that Despite numerous problems he completed and fitted out a beautiful seventy foot schooner Wavewalker The schooner carried the Cook family to Madeira the Canary Islands and then 6000 miles to Rio de Janeiro They then followed Captain Cook s route across the South Atlantic calling at the remote island of Tristan da Cuna before arriving in Cape Town Leaving Cape Town Wavewalker sailed 3 000 miles towards Australia in the worst Roaring Forties weather for many years with 60 foot waves from the West Then a storm from the South Pole created equally large waves and the schooner was eventually overwhelmed by a huge combined wave that threw Gordon overboard and smashed through the decks filling the schooner with sea water Despite massive damage and against all the odds the family kept the ship afloat and made temporary repairs The schooner was then hit by cyclone Clarence before sailing the last 2 000 miles voyage to Australia Gordon was awarded the prestigious Lady Swathling Trophy by the Shipwrecked Mariner s Society for that year s most outstanding act of seamanship and navigation that saved the lives of all the people on board