List books in category Arts & Entertainment / Drama

  • The Complete Poems and Plays, 1909–1950

    The Complete Poems and Plays, 1909–1950
    T. S. Eliot

    An indispensable collection of the Nobel Prize winner’s most renowned works. “In ten years’ time,” wrote Edmund Wilson in Axel’s Castle, “Eliot has left upon English poetry a mark more unmistakable than that of any other poet writing in English.” In 1948, Eliot was awarded the Nobel Prize “for his work as a trail-blazing pioneer of modern poetry.” This book is made up of six individual titles: Four Quartets, Collected Poems: 1909–1935, Murder in the Cathedral, The Family Reunion, Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, and The Cocktail Party. It offers not only enjoyment of one of the great talents in contemporary literature, but a deeper understanding of such classics as “The Waste Land,” “The Hollow Men,” “Ash Wednesday,” “Prufrock,” “Murder in the Cathedral,” and “The Cocktail Party.” The Complete Poems and Plays of T. S. Eliot is indispensable.

  • Freeing Shakespeare s Voice: The Actor s Guide to Talking the Text

    Freeing Shakespeare’s Voice: The Actor’s Guide to Talking the Text
    Kristin Linklater

    A passionate exploration of the process of comprehending and speaking the words of William Shakespeare. Detailing exercises and analyzing characters' speech and rhythms, Linklater provides the tools to increase understanding and make Shakespeare's words one's own.

  • Indecent (TCG Edition)

    Indecent (TCG Edition)
    Paula Vogel

    “Revelatory…As intimate and immediate as a whispered secret. Vogel’s play thrums with music, desire, and fear, and it’s shrewd about the ways in which America isn’t free, and about how art does and doesn’t transcend the perilous winds of history.” —New Yorker “Superbly realized…Indecent, the powerful play by Paula Vogel, sheds an eye-opening light on a little-known time when theatrical history, Jewish culture, and the frank depiction of homosexuality intersected, with explosive results.” —New York Times “Gorgeous. Illuminating and heartbreaking. Rich in sympathy and humor, Indecent has the scope of an epic but the intimacy of a chamber piece…It celebrates and illustrates the power of theater.” —Time Out New York “A moving and fascinating play…A singular achievement… The historical perspective is vast and knowing…Has there ever been anything quite like Indecent, a play that touches—I mean deeply touches—so much rich emotion about history and the theater, anti-Semitism, homophobia, censorship, world wars, red-baiting, and oh, yes, joyful human passion?…An extraordinary play.” —Newsday “Indecent is more than a play about forbidden love: It’s about theater as a life force.” —New York Post When Sholem Asch wrote God of Vengeance in 1907, he didn’t imagine the height of controversy the play would eventually reach. Performing at first in Yiddish and German, the play’s subject matter wasn’t deemed contentious until it was produced in English, when the American audiences were scandalized by the onstage depiction of an amorous affair between two women. Paula Vogel’s newest work traces the trajectory of the show’s success through its tour in Europe to its abrupt and explosive demise on Broadway in 1923—including the arrest of the entire production’s cast and crew. Paula Vogel is the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of How I Learned to Drive. Her other plays include Don Juan Comes Home from Iraq, A Civil War Christmas, The Long Christmas Ride Home, and The Baltimore Waltz, among others. She has also had a distinguished career as a teacher and mentor to younger playwrights, first at Brown University and then at the Yale School of Drama.

  • Murder in the Cathedral

    Murder in the Cathedral
    T. S. Eliot

    T. S. Eliot's verse dramatization of the murder of Thomas Becket at Canterbury, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature The Archbishop Thomas Becket speaks fatal words before he is martyred in T. S. Eliot's best-known drama, based on the murder of the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1170. Praised for its poetically masterful handling of issues of faith, politics, and the common good, T. S. Eliot's play bolstered his reputation as the most significant poet of his time.

  • A Strange Way To Save You And Me: A Christmas Play For The Small Church

    A Strange Way To Save You And Me: A Christmas Play For The Small Church
    Eva Juliuson

    This play is presented as a reading with the actors silently acting out their parts as the narrators read from the side of the stage or chancel. Accompanying the script are suggested solos and hymns for choir or congregational participation. – Requires no memorization – Minimal rehearsal needed – Ideal for Christmas Eve or Christmas Day In addition to raising six children, Eva Juliuson has worked with hundreds of young people during her twelve years as a licensed home caretaker of children. She has worked in after-school ministry, and as a youth worker, Sunday School teacher, and PTA volunteer. Her greatest thrill is being able to introduce others to a life-changing relationship with the Lord.

  • Fences

    Fences
    August Wilson

    From legendary playwright August Wilson comes the powerful, stunning dramatic bestseller that won him critical acclaim, including the Tony Award for Best Play and the Pulitzer Prize.Troy Maxson is a strong man, a hard man. He has had to be to survive. Troy Maxson has gone through life in an America where to be proud and black is to face pressures that could crush a man, body and soul. But the 1950s are yielding to the new spirit of liberation in the 1960s, a spirit that is changing the world Troy Maxson has learned to deal with the only way he can, a spirit that is making him a stranger, angry and afraid, in a world he never knew and to a wife and son he understands less and less. This is a modern classic, a book that deals with the impossibly difficult themes of race in America, set during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s. Now an Academy Award-winning film directed by and starring Denzel Washington, along with Academy Award and Golden Globe winner Viola Davis.

  • Sea Wall

    Sea Wall
    Simon Stephens

    There's a hole running through the centre of my stomach. You must have all felt a bit awkward because you can probably see it. Sea Wall is a delicate monologue, completely devastating and beautifully powerful.Alex's story, spoken directly to the audience, begins full of clear light and smiles, as he speaks about his wife, visiting her father in the South of France, having a daughter, photography, and the bottom of the sea. His tone is natural, happy and engaging, with flickers of questions about belief and religion glimpsed under the surface. But his contentment falls away into deep and heart-breaking grief, crumbling to pieces with a vividness that is incredibly moving.

  • A Midsummer Night s Dream

    A Midsummer Night’s Dream
    William Shakespeare

    In A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Shakespeare stages the workings of love. Theseus and Hippolyta, about to marry, are figures from mythology. In the woods outside Theseus’ Athens, two young men and two young women sort themselves out into couples—but not before they form first one love triangle, and then another. Also in the woods, the king and queen of fairyland, Oberon and Titania, battle over custody of an orphan boy; Oberon uses magic to make Titania fall in love with a weaver named Bottom, whose head is temporarily transformed into that of a donkey by a hobgoblin or “puck,” Robin Goodfellow. Finally, Bottom and his companions ineptly stage the tragedy of “Pyramus and Thisbe.” The authoritative edition of A Midsummer Night's Dream from The Folger Shakespeare Library, the trusted and widely used Shakespeare series for students and general readers, includes: -The exact text of the printed book for easy cross-reference -Hundreds of hypertext links for instant navigation -Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play -Full explanatory notes conveniently linked to the text of the play -Scene-by-scene plot summaries -A key to the play’s famous lines and phrases -An introduction to reading Shakespeare’s language -An essay by a leading Shakespeare scholar providing a modern perspective on the play -Fresh images from the Folger Shakespeare Library’s vast holdings of rare books -An annotated guide to further reading Essay by Catherine Belsey The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, is home to the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare’s printed works, and a magnet for Shakespeare scholars from around the globe. In addition to exhibitions open to the public throughout the year, the Folger offers a full calendar of performances and programs. For more information, visit Folger.edu.

  • San Francisco Scarecrows

    San Francisco Scarecrows
    Kevin Lottes

    Hopper and Ozzie travel from the Midwest to the West Coast to find what is missing in their lives. The authenticity of their identity and their view of the world around them depends on it.

  • Miss Witherspoon and Mrs. Bob Cratchit s Wild Christmas Binge: Two Plays

    Miss Witherspoon and Mrs. Bob Cratchit’s Wild Christmas Binge: Two Plays
    Christopher Durang

    Christopher Durang, the criminally funny author of Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You, returns to the scene of his prime with two raucous new plays about death, religion, and a creamy Christmas pudding. In Miss Witherspoon—named one of the Ten Best Plays of 2005 by both Time and Newsday—Veronica, a recent suicide whose cantankerous attitude has not improved in the afterlife, discovers that the one thing worse than the world she left behind is having to go back for seconds. Ordered to cleanse her “brown tweedy aura,” Veronica resists being reincarnated (as a trailer-trash teen or an overexcited Golden Retriever), only to find that she may be mankind’s last, best hope for survival. In Mrs. Bob Cratchit’s Wild Christmas Binge, a sassy ghost once again attempts to shake Scrooge from his holiday humbug, but the whole family-friendly affair is deliciously derailed by Mrs. Cratchit’s drunken insistence on stepping out of her miserable, treacly role. Morals are subverted, starving yet plucky children sing carols, and somebody’s goose is cooked as Durang lovingly skewers A Christmas Carol, It’s a Wonderful Life, and many more to create a brand-new, cracked Christmas classic.

  • Romeo And Juliet: The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet

    Romeo And Juliet: The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet
    William Shakespeare

    When Romeo, heartbroken and love-sick over Rosalind, meets Juliet, he falls in love almost instantly. Masked and unaware of her family origins, Romeo doesn’t realize that Juliet is a Capulet—sworn enemies of his family, the Montagues. The lovers decide to escape their families’ legacies and marry. Yet, it is not to be so—Juliet and her Romeo meet a tragic end, which finally unites their families and ends years of strife. Perhaps the most famous love story in the world, Romeo and Juliet is Shakespeare’s most enduring work, and from Shakespeare in Love to Shakespeare in the Park, the star-crossed lovers have met across a crowded stage for over four hundred years.Known as “The Bard of Avon,” William Shakespeare is arguably the greatest English-language writer known. Enormously popular during his life, Shakespeare’s works continue to resonate more than three centuries after his death, as has his influence on theatre and literature. Shakespeare’s innovative use of character, language, and experimentation with romance as tragedy served as a foundation for later playwrights and dramatists, and some of his most famous lines of dialogue have become part of everyday speech.HarperPerennialClassics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

  • An Ideal Husband

    An Ideal Husband
    Oscar Wilde

    Although Oscar Wilde (1854–1900) created a wide range of poetry, essays, and fairy tales (and one novel) in his brief, tragic life, he is perhaps best known as a dramatist. His witty, clever drama, populated by brilliant talkers skilled in the art of riposte and paradox, are still staples of the theatrical repertoire.An Ideal Husband revolves around a blackmail scheme that forces a married couple to reexamine their moral standards — providing, along the way, a wry commentary on the rarity of politicians who can claim to be ethically pure. A supporting cast of young lovers, society matrons, an overbearing father, and a formidable femme fatale continually exchange sparkling repartee, keeping the play moving at a lively pace.Like most of Wilde's plays, this scintillating drawing-room comedy is wise, well-constructed, and deeply satisfying. An instant success at its 1895 debut, the play continues to delight audiences over one hundred years later. An Ideal Husband is a must-read for Wilde fans, students of English literature, and anyone delighted by wit, urbanity, and timeless sophistication.

  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

    Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
    Tennessee Williams

    The definitive text of this American classic—reissued with an introduction by Edward Albee (Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and A Delicate Balance) and Williams' essay "Person-to-Person." Cat on a Hot Tin Roof first heated up Broadway in 1955 with its gothic American story of brothers vying for their dying father's inheritance amid a whirlwind of sexuality, untethered in the person of Maggie the Cat. The play also daringly showcased the burden of sexuality repressed in the agony of her husband, Brick Pollitt. In spite of the public controversy Cat stirred up, it was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the Drama Critics Circle Award for that year. Williams, as he so often did with his plays, rewrote Cat on a Hot Tin Roof for many years—the present version was originally produced at the American Shakespeare Festival in 1974 with all the changes that made Williams finally declare the text to be definitive, and was most recently produced on Broadway in the 2003-04 season. This definitive edition also includes Williams' essay "Person-to-Person," Williams' notes on the various endings, and a short chronology of the author's life. One of America's greatest living playwrights, as well as a friend and colleague of Williams, Edward Albee has written a concise introduction to the play from a playwright's perspective, examining the candor, sensuality, power, and impact of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof then and now.

  • Desdemona

    Desdemona
    Toni Morrison

    The story of Desdemona from Shakespeare's Othello is re-imagined by Nobel Prize laureate Toni Morrison, Malian singer and songwriter Rokia Traoré, and acclaimed stage director Peter Sellars. Morrison's response to Sellars’ 2009 production of Othello is an intimate dialogue of words and music between Desdemona and her African nurse Barbary. Morrison gives voice and depth to the female characters, letting them speak and sing in the fullness of their hearts. Desdemona is an extraordinary narrative of words, music and song about Shakespeare’s doomed heroine, who speaks from the grave about the traumas of race, class, gender, war — and the transformative power of love. Toni Morrison transports one of the most iconic, central, and disturbing treatments of race in Western culture into the new realities and potential outcomes facing a rising generation of the 21st century.

  • You Can t Keep Jesus in the Nativity Scene: Sunday School Christmas Program

    You Can’t Keep Jesus in the Nativity Scene: Sunday School Christmas Program
    Cynthia E. Cowen

  • How I Learned to Drive (Stand-Alone TCG Edition)

    How I Learned to Drive (Stand-Alone TCG Edition)
    Paula Vogel

    Newly published as a stand-alone edition, Vogel’s widely celebrated masterpiece How I Learned to Drive was the winner of the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, the Obie and Drama Desk Awards for Outstanding Play, and other honors. Known for its dark subject matter, the play examines the effects of child abuse on identity and the discovery of strength through trauma.

  • The Rolling Stone

    The Rolling Stone
    Chris Urch

    One day you're you. The next you're – I can't even say the word. Dembe and Sam have been seeing each other for a while. They should be wondering where this is going and when to introduce each other to their families. But they're gay and this is Uganda. The consequences of their relationship being discovered will be violent and explosive. Especially for Dembe, whose brother goes into the pulpit each week to denounce the evils of one man loving another.A Bruntwood Prize for Playwriting winner in 2013, The Rolling Stone received its world premiere at the Royal Exchange, Manchester, on 21 April 2015.

  • Life Of Galileo

    Life Of Galileo
    Bertolt Brecht

    This Student Edition of Brecht's classic dramatisation of the conflict between free enquiry and official ideology features an extensive introduction and commentary that includes a plot summary, discussion of the context, themes, characters, style and language as well as questions for further study and notes on words and phrases in the text. It is the perfect edition for students of theatre and literature Along with Mother Courage, the character of Galileo is one of Brecht'sgreatest creations, immensely live, human and complex. Unable to resisthis appetite for scientific investigation, Galileo's hereticaldiscoveries about the solar system bring him to the attention of theInquisition. He is scared into publicly abjuring his theories but,despite his self-contempt, goes on working in private, eventuallyhelping to smuggle his writings out of the country.As anexamination of the problems that face not only the scientist but alsothe whole spirit of free inquiry when brought into conflict with therequirements of government or official ideology, Life of Galileo has few equals. Written in exile in 1937-9 and first performed in Zurich in 1943, Galileowas first staged in English in 1947 by Joseph Losey in a versionjointly prepared by Brecht and Charles Laughton, who played the titlerole. Printed here is the complete translation by John Willett.

  • The Vagina Monologues: 20th Anniversary Edition

    The Vagina Monologues: 20th Anniversary Edition
    Eve Ensler

    A landmark in women’s empowerment—as relevant as ever in the age of #MeToo—that honors female sexuality in all its complexity It’s been more than twenty years since Eve Ensler’s international sensation The Vagina Monologues gave birth to V-Day, the radical, global grassroots movement to end violence against women and girls. This special edition features six never-before-published monologues, a new foreword by National Book Award winner Jacqueline Woodson, a new introduction by the author, and a new afterword by One Billion Rising director Monique Wilson on the stage phenomenon’s global impact. Witty and irreverent, compassionate and wise, this award-winning masterpiece gives voice to real women’s deepest fantasies, fears, anger, and pleasure, and calls for a world where all women are safe, equal, free, and alive in their bodies.Praise for The Vagina Monologues “Probably the most important piece of political theater of the last decade.”—The New York Times“This play changed the world. Seeing it changed my soul. Performing in it changed my life. I am forever indebted to Eve Ensler and the transformative legacy of this play.”—Kerry Washington “Spellbinding, funny, and almost unbearably moving . . . both a work of art and an incisive piece of cultural history, a poem and a polemic, a performance and a balm and a benediction.”—Variety “Often wrenching, frequently riotous. . . . Ensler is an impassioned wit.”—Los Angeles Times “Extraordinary . . . a compelling rhapsody of the female essence.”—Chicago Tribune

  • Everyman

    Everyman
    Anonymous

    Western drama, having all but disappeared during the Dark Ages, reemerged spontaneously in the liturgy and life of the medieval church. Vernacular miracle plays of England's Middle Ages were performed by lay people — many by trade guilds — unschooled in church Latin, but familiar with the biblical events upon which the dramas were based. Morality plays provided moral instruction, their principal characters vivid personifications of virtue and vice. The most durable of the morality plays has proven to be Everyman, whose central character, summoned by Death, must face final judgment on the strength of his good deeds. This venerable drama is reprinted here along with three other medieval classics: The Second Shepherds' Play, Noah's Flood, and Hickscorner.

  • Life Is a Dream

    Life Is a Dream
    Pedro Calderón de la Barca

    A product of the golden age of Spanish drama, Life Is a Dream (La vida es sueño) is the masterpiece of Pedro Calderón de la Barca (1600–1681), a contemporary of Lope de Vega and one of Spain's greatest literary figures.Acclaimed for his superb dramatic instincts and philosophical seriousness as well as his extraordinary imagination, Calderón exercised his best qualities in this allegorical play, an exploration of the mysteries of human destiny, the illusory nature of earthly existence, and the struggle between predestination and free will. The story revolves around the moral dilemmas of a Polish prince, unjustly imprisoned by his suspicious father. Against a background of revolution, Calderón builds a dramatic edifice of outstanding theatricality, rich in symbolism and metaphor, expressed in magnificent poetry.This excellent new English translation is absolutely complete, and as close and direct as possible. Ample footnotes and an informative introductory Publisher's Note enhance the value of its modest price.

  • Lapd Chronicles: The War on Drugs: a Personal Account How It Began and Why It Makes Sense

    Lapd Chronicles: The War on Drugs: a Personal Account How It Began and Why It Makes Sense
    Hank Foresta

    This book is a seldom-told true story of some of the law enforcement heroes. They worked long and hard in incredibly dangerous and uncomfortable situations, fighting the war on drugs, which no one but them ever expected. They started before there was a declaration of war. From personal and professional experience, they knew that this country, its people, its institutions, its economy, and its leadership in the free world were in peril. They saw the growing menace to our kids, to our schools, and even to law enforcement. Someone had to fight back with uncommon valor and dedication. More than four thousand three hundred people have been killed in the last year and a half. Police stations have been bombed, and officers have been shot and killed in police facilities. Some police officials have been kidnapped, shot gangland style, tortured, and even beheaded. Police and government officials at the highest levels have been the object of assassination and, along with their bodyguards, shot and killed. In one city, thirteen people were shot and killed in one evening and left dead in the street. In another city, sixteen people, including a twelve-year-old girl, were shot. The government sent in the military in large numbers, but the killings continued.

  • Antigone

    Antigone
    Sophocles

    In his long life, Sophocles (born ca. 496 B.C., died after 413) wrote more than one hundred plays. Of these, seven complete tragedies remain, among them the famed Oedipus Rex and Oedipus at Colonus. In Antigone, he reveals the fate that befalls the children of Oedipus. With its passionate speeches and sensitive probing of moral and philosophical issues, this powerful drama enthralled its first Athenian audiences and won great honors for Sophocles.The setting of the play is Thebes. Polynices, son of Oedipus, has led a rebellious army against his brother, Eteocles, ruler of Thebes. Both have died in single combat. When Creon, their uncle, assumes rule, he commands that the body of the rebel Polynices be left unburied and unmourned, and warns that anyone who tampers with his decree will be put to death.Antigone, sister of Polynices, defies Creon's order and buries her brother, claiming that she honors first the laws of the gods. Enraged, Creon condemns her to be sealed in a cave and left to die. How the gods take their revenge on Creon provides the gripping denouement to this compelling tragedy, which remains today one of the most frequently performed of classical Greek dramas.

  • The Three Theban Plays: Antigone; Oedipus the King; Oedipus at Colonus

    The Three Theban Plays: Antigone; Oedipus the King; Oedipus at Colonus
    Sophocles

    The heroic Greek dramas that have moved theatergoers and readers since the fifth century B.C.Towering over the rest of Greek tragedy, the three plays that tell the story of the fated Theban royal family—Antigone, Oedipus the King and Oedipus at Colonus—are among the most enduring and timeless dramas ever written. Robert Fagles's authoritative and acclaimed translation conveys all of Sophocles's lucidity and power: the cut and thrust of his dialogue, his ironic edge, the surge and majesty of his choruses and, above all, the agonies and triumphs of his characters. This Penguin Classics edition features an introduction and notes by the renowned classicist Bernard Knox.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

  • Greek Tragedies 1: Aeschylus: Agamemnon, Prometheus Bound; Sophocles: Oedipus the King, Antigone; Euripides: Hippolytus

    Greek Tragedies 1: Aeschylus: Agamemnon, Prometheus Bound; Sophocles: Oedipus the King, Antigone; Euripides: Hippolytus
    Mark Griffith

    Greek Tragedies, Volume I contains Aeschylus’s “Agamemnon,” translated by Richmond Lattimore; Aeschylus’s “Prometheus Bound,” translated by David Grene; Sophocles’s “Oedipus the King,” translated by David Grene; Sophocles’s “Antigone,” translated by Elizabeth Wyckoff; and Euripides’s “Hippolytus,” translated by David Grene. Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous project: a new translation of the Greek tragedies that would be the ultimate resource for teachers, students, and readers. They succeeded. Under the expert management of eminent classicists David Grene and Richmond Lattimore, those translations combined accuracy, poetic immediacy, and clarity of presentation to render the surviving masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in an English so lively and compelling that they remain the standard translations. Today, Chicago is taking pains to ensure that our Greek tragedies remain the leading English-language versions throughout the twenty-first century. In this highly anticipated third edition, Mark Griffith and Glenn W. Most have carefully updated the translations to bring them even closer to the ancient Greek while retaining the vibrancy for which our English versions are famous. This edition also includes brand-new translations of Euripides’ Medea, The Children of Heracles, Andromache, and Iphigenia among the Taurians, fragments of lost plays by Aeschylus, and the surviving portion of Sophocles’s satyr-drama The Trackers. New introductions for each play offer essential information about its first production, plot, and reception in antiquity and beyond. In addition, each volume includes an introduction to the life and work of its tragedian, as well as notes addressing textual uncertainties and a glossary of names and places mentioned in the plays. In addition to the new content, the volumes have been reorganized both within and between volumes to reflect the most up-to-date scholarship on the order in which the plays were originally written. The result is a set of handsome paperbacks destined to introduce new generations of readers to these foundational works of Western drama, art, and life.

  • The Humans (Revised TCG Edition)

    The Humans (Revised TCG Edition)
    Stephen Karam

    Breaking with tradition, Erik Blake has brought his Pennsylvania family to celebrate Thanksgiving at his daughter’s apartment in Manhattan. Unfolding over a single scene, this “delirious tragicomedy” (Chicago Sun-Times) by acclaimed young playwright Stephen Karam “infuses the traditional kitchen-sink family drama with qualities of horror in his portentous and penetrating work of psychological unease” (Variety), creating an indelible family portrait.

  • Cato: A tragedy in five acts

    Cato: A tragedy in five acts
    Joseph Addison

    The tragedy Cato was written by Joseph Addison in 1712 and recounts the last days of Marcus Porcius Cato Uticensis, a Stoic who was always resistant to Julius Caesar's tyranny and an icon of republicanism, virtue, and liberty. The main themes of the play are individual liberty versus government tyranny and Cato's personal struggle to hold to his beliefs in the face of death.

  • Other Desert Cities: A Play

    Other Desert Cities: A Play
    Jon Robin Baitz

    A political family confronts its dark history in this Pulitzer Prize-finalist play “with gleaming dialogue [and] tantalizing hints of a dangerous mystery” (Ben Brantley, The New York Times). Winner of the Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding New Off-Broadway Play Brooke Wyeth hasn’t been home to visit her parents in years. But now she’s back in Palm Springs for Christmas, and she has a startling announcement to make. Brooke is about to publish a detailed and intimate family memoir—one that will open a wound her politically prominent parents don’t want reopened. First appearing on Broadway in a hit production starring Stacy Keach and Stockard Channing, Other Desert Cities “examine[s] the fractiousness of American politics through the prism of one family” (David Rooney, Hollywood Reporter).

  • The Piano Lesson

    The Piano Lesson
    August Wilson

    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and winner of the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play, this modern American classic is about family, and the legacy of slavery in America. August Wilson has already given the American theater such spell-binding plays about the black experience in 20th-century America as Ma Rainey's Black Bottom, Joe Turner's Come and Gone, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning Fences. In his second Pulitzer Prize-winner, The Piano Lesson, Wilson has fashioned perhaps his most haunting and dramatic work. At the heart of the play stands the ornately carved upright piano which, as the Charles family's prized, hard-won possession, has been gathering dust in the parlor of Berniece Charles's Pittsburgh home. When Boy Willie, Berniece's exuberant brother, bursts into her life with his dream of buying the same Mississippi land that his family had worked as slaves, he plans to sell their antique piano for the hard cash he needs to stake his future. But Berniece refuses to sell, clinging to the piano as a reminder of the history that is their family legacy. This dilemma is the real "piano lesson," reminding us that blacks are often deprived both of the symbols of their past and of opportunity in the present.

  • Othello: A Tragedy

    Othello: A Tragedy
    William Shakespeare

    Othello, a Moorish captain, secretly falls in love with and marries Desdemona, the daughter of a Venetian nobleman. While the two live happily at first, a spurned suitor of Desdemona’s and Iago, an ambitious officer under Othello’s command, plan to tear the couple apart out of revenge for perceived slights suffered at their hands.Known as “The Bard of Avon,” William Shakespeare is arguably the greatest English-language writer known. Enormously popular during his life, Shakespeare’s works continue to resonate more than three centuries after his death, as has his influence on theatre and literature. Shakespeare’s innovative use of character, language, and experimentation with romance as tragedy served as a foundation for later playwrights and dramatists, and some of his most famous lines of dialogue have become part of everyday speech.HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

  • Henry IV: Part 1

    Henry IV: Part 1
    William Shakespeare

    Henry IV sits on a usurped throne, his conscience and his nobles in revolt, while his son Hal is immersed in a self-indulgent life of revelry with the notorious Sir John Falstaff. Shakespeare explores questions of kingship and honor in this masterly mingling of history, comedy, and tragedy. Under the editorial supervision of Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen, two of today’s most accomplished Shakespearean scholars, this Modern Library series incorporates definitive texts and authoritative notes from William Shakespeare: Complete Works. Each play includes an Introduction as well as an overview of Shakespeare’s theatrical career; commentary on past and current productions based on interviews with leading directors, actors, and designers; scene-by-scene analysis; key facts about the work; a chronology of Shakespeare’s life and times; and black-and-white illustrations. Ideal for students, theater professionals, and general readers, these modern and accessible editions from the Royal Shakespeare Company set a new standard in Shakespearean literature for the twenty-first century.

  • As a Man Thinketh: 21st Century Edition (The Wisdom of James Allen)

    As a Man Thinketh: 21st Century Edition (The Wisdom of James Allen)
    James Allen

    In the years since its publication in 1902, "As a Man Thinketh" has set thousands of men on the pathway to personal and financial growth. Now, in this unique rendition of James Allen's masterwork, you, too, can manifest the traits and skills characteristic of those honorable, refined, and successful men. Each of the aphorisms and quotes in this book reveals simple yet revelatory techniques that will empower you to strengthen your character, harness constructive thoughts, and create the life you've always wanted. As Allen himself wrote, "As a Man Thinketh" 'shall create positive results in daily circumstances and actions, regardless of the venue—an agreeable prospect, one must concede!'

  • The Nether: A Play

    The Nether: A Play
    Jennifer Haley

    The Nether, a daring examination of moral responsibility in virtual worlds, opens with a familiar interrogation scene given a technological twist. As Detective Morris, an online investigator, questions Mr. Sims about his activities in a role-playing realm so realistic it could be life, she finds herself on slippery ethical ground. Sims argues for the freedom to explore even the most deviant corners of our imagination. Morris holds that we cannot flesh out our malign fantasies without consequence. Their clash of wills leads to a consequence neither could have imagined. Suspenseful, ingeniously constructed, and fiercely intelligent, Haley’s play forces us to confront deeply disturbing questions about the boundaries of reality.

  • Joe Turner s Come and Gone

    Joe Turner’s Come and Gone
    August Wilson

    From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Fences comes Joe Turner's Come and Gone—Winner of the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play. “The glow accompanying August Wilson’s place in contemporary American theater is fixed.”—Toni Morrison When Harold Loomis arrives at a black Pittsburgh boardinghouse after seven years' impressed labor on Joe Turner's chain gang, he is a free man—in body. But the scars of his enslavement and a sense of inescapable alienation oppress his spirit still, and the seemingly hospitable rooming house seethes with tension and distrust in the presence of this tormented stranger. Loomis is looking for the wife he left behind, believing that she can help him reclaim his old identity. But through his encounters with the other residents he begins to realize that what he really seeks is his rightful place in a new world—and it will take more than the skill of the local “People Finder” to discover it. This jazz-influenced drama is a moving narrative of African-American experience in the 20th century.

  • The Alchemist

    The Alchemist
    Ben Jonson

    According to Wikipedia: "Benjamin Jonson (c. 11 June 1572 – 6 August 1637) was an English Renaissance dramatist, poet and actor. A contemporary of William Shakespeare, he is best known for his satirical plays, particularly Volpone, The Alchemist, and Bartholomew Fair, which are considered his best, and his lyric poems. A man of vast reading and a seemingly insatiable appetite for controversy, Jonson had an unparalleled breadth of influence on Jacobean and Caroline playwrights and poets."

  • Much Ado About Nothing: A Comedy

    Much Ado About Nothing: A Comedy
    William Shakespeare

    Two couples—Benedick and Beatrice, and Hero and Claudio—must overcome deception, gossip, and, occasionally, their own misplaced pride if their love is to persevere. Aided by military commander Don Pedro and impeded by his brother Don John, the friends go to great lengths in the pursuit of marriage.Known as “The Bard of Avon,” William Shakespeare is arguably the greatest English-language writer known. Enormously popular during his life, Shakespeare’s works continue to resonate more than three centuries after his death, as has his influence on theatre and literature. Shakespeare’s innovative use of character, language, and experimentation with romance as tragedy served as a foundation for later playwrights and dramatists, and some of his most famous lines of dialogue have become part of everyday speech.HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

  • Dance Nation

    Dance Nation
    Clare Barron

    'Maybe this is the year, this is the moment, this is the dance where your lives will start!'Somewhere in America, a revolution is coming.An army of competitive dancers is ready to take over the world, one routine at a time.With a pre-teen battle for power and perfection raging on and off stage, Dance Nation is a ferocious exploration of youth, ambition and self-discovery.Winner of the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize and The Relentless Award, Dance Nation is Clare Barron’s explosive new play.

  • The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: All 213 Plays, Poems, Sonnets, Apocryphal Plays + The Biography: The Life of William Shakespeare by Sidney Lee: Hamlet - Romeo and Juliet - King Lear - A Midsummer Night’s Dream - Macbeth - The Tempest - Othello and many more

    The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: All 213 Plays, Poems, Sonnets, Apocryphal Plays + The Biography: The Life of William Shakespeare by Sidney Lee: Hamlet – Romeo and Juliet – King Lear – A Midsummer Night’s Dream – Macbeth – The Tempest – Othello and many more
    William Shakespeare

    This carefully crafted ebook: “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. William Shakespeare is recognized as one of the greatest writers of all time, known for works like "Hamlet," "Much Ado About Nothing," "Romeo and Juliet," "Othello," "The Tempest," and many other works. With the 154 poems and 37 plays of Shakespeare's literary career, his body of works are among the most quoted in literature. Shakespeare created comedies, histories, tragedies, and poetry. Despite the authorship controversies that have surrounded his works, the name of Shakespeare continues to be revered by scholars and writers from around the world. William Shakespeare (1564 – 1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon". His extant works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, the authorship of some of which is uncertain.

  • Osama the Hero

    Osama the Hero
    Dennis Kelly

    Gary's not stupid. He just dares to see the world differently. In the class room and on the estate, he provokes without intent. When another act of violence unsettles those around him, Gary must shoulder the blame. A visceral rollercoaster of a play by one of Britain's hottest writers. Raw, angry and urgent, this is an explosive piece of work.

  • Intimate Apparel/Fabulation

    Intimate Apparel/Fabulation
    Lynn Nottage

    “Lynn Nottage’s work explores depths of humanness, the overlapping complexities of race, gender, culture and history—and the startling simplicity of desire—with a clear tenderness, with humor, with compassion.” —Paula Vogel, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Intimate Apparel: “Thoughtful, affecting new play . . . with seamless elegance.”—Charles Isherwood, Variety Fabulation: “Robustly entertaining comedy . . . with punchy social insights and the firecracker snap of unexpected humor.”—Ben Brantley, The New York Times With her two latest plays, “exceptionally gifted playwright” (New York Observer) Lynn Nottage has created companion pieces that span 100 years in the lives of African American women. Intimate Apparel is about the empowerment of Esther, a proud and shy seamstress in 1905 New York who creates exquisite lingerie for both Fifth Avenue boudoirs and Tenderloin bordellos. In Fabulation Nottage re-imagines Esther as Undine, the PR-diva of today, who spirals down from her swanky Manhattan office to her roots back in Brooklyn. Through opposite journeys, Esther and Undine achieve the same satisfying end, one of self-discovery. Lynn Nottage’s plays include Crumbs from the Table of Joy; Mud, River, Stone; Por’ Knockers; Las Menias; Fabulation and Intimate Apparel, for which she was awarded the Francesca Primus Prize and the American Theatre Critics/Steinberg New Play Award in 2004. Her plays have been produced at theatres throughout the country, with Intimate Apparel slated for 16 productions during the 2005–2006 season.

  • The Oedipus Cycle: A New Translation

    The Oedipus Cycle: A New Translation
    Sophocles

    Award-winning poet and playwright Robert Bagg offers a set of exciting and authentic new translations of Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Kolonos, and Antigone—together known as The Oedipus Cycle. One of the unquestionable acmes of world literature, Sophocles’s immortal series of plays centers upon the royal family of Thebes, whose struggles for nobility and greatness lead paradoxically to their own tragic downfalls. Portraying humankind at its worst and most fallible even while exploring the heights of virtue and honor, the plays shine a searing light upon questions of fate and free will, destiny and responsibility, hubris and humility, honor and obligation, and more. Robert Bagg’s timely translations allow the power and depth of Sophocles’s masterpieces to shine through clearly to readers today.

  • A Midsummer Night s Dream

    A Midsummer Night’s Dream
    William Shakespeare

    Perhaps the most popular of all of Shakespeare's comedies, A Midsummer Night's Dream humorously celebrates the vagaries of love. The approaching wedding festivities of Theseus, Duke of Athens, and his bride-to-be, Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons, are delightfully crisscrossed with in-again, off-again romances of two young pairs of Athenian lovers; a fateful rivalry between the King and Queen of the Fairies; and the theatrical aspirations of a bumbling troupe of Athenian laborers. It all ends happily in wedding-night revelry complete with a play-within-a-play presented by the laborers to the ecstatic amusement of all. This edition, complete with explanatory footnotes, is reprinted from a standard British edition.

  • Jen Silverman: Three Plays

    Jen Silverman: Three Plays
    Jen Silverman

    Three plays from award-winning American Playwright Jen Silverman. Contains the plays The Roommate, The Moors and Collective Rage: A Play in 5 Betties.Collective Rage: A Play in 5 Betties – Five different women named Betty collide at the intersection of anger, sex, and the “thea-tah.”The Moors – Two sisters and a dog live out their lives on the bleak English moors, and dream of love and power. A dark comedy about love, desperation, and visibility.The Roommate – A dark comedy about what it takes to re-route your life – and what happens when the wheels come off.

  • Mother Courage and Her Children

    Mother Courage and Her Children
    Bertolt Brecht

    This Student Edition of Brecht's anti-war masterpiece features an extensiveintroduction and commentary that includes a plot summary, discussion ofthe context, themes, characters, style and language as well asquestions for further study and notes on words and phrases in the text.It is the perfect edition for students of theatre and literature.In this chronicle of the Thirty Years War of the seventeenth century, Mother Courage follows the armies back and forth across Europe, selling provisions and liquor from her canteen wagon. As the action of the play progresses between the years 1624 and 1646 she loses her children to the war but remains indomitable, refusing to part with her livelihood – the wagon. The play is one of the most celebrated examples of Epic Theatre and of Brecht's use of alienation effect to focus attention on the issues of the play above the individual characters. It remains regarded as one of the greatest plays of the twentieth century and one of the great anti-war plays of all time. The Berlin production of 1949, with Helene Weigel as Mother Courage, marked the foundation of the Berliner Ensemble. This volume contains expert notes on the author's life and work, historical and political background to the play, photographs from stage productions and a glossary of difficult words and phrases. The play is translated by Brecht scholar John Willett who did more than anyone else to make Brecht's work available in the English language.

  • A Raisin in the Sun

    A Raisin in the Sun
    Lorraine Hansberry

    "Never before, the entire history of the American theater, has so much of the truth of black people's lives been seen on the stage," observed James Baldwin shortly before A Raisin in the Sun opened on Broadway in 1959.Indeed Lorraine Hansberry's award-winning drama about the hopes and aspirations of a struggling, working-class family living on the South Side of Chicago connected profoundly with the psyche of black America–and changed American theater forever. The play's title comes from a line in Langston Hughes's poem "Harlem," which warns that a dream deferred might "dry up/like a raisin in the sun.""The events of every passing year add resonance to A Raisin in the Sun," said The New York Times. "It is as if history is conspiring to make the play a classic." This Modern Library edition presents the fully restored, uncut version of Hansberry's landmark work with an introduction by Robert Nemiroff.

  • Rapture, Blister, Burn

    Rapture, Blister, Burn
    Gina Gionfriddo

    Women are running for president. Men are exfoliating. It's all jumbled: you can't read the signs.Can any woman have it all? After university Catherine and Gwen chose opposite paths: Catherine built a career as a rock-star academic, while Gwen built a home with a husband and children. Decades later, unfulfilled in opposite ways, each woman covets the other's life, and a dangerous game begins as each tries to claim the other's territory. Sparks fly and the age-old question arises: what do women really want?Gina Gionfriddo dissects modern gender politics in this breathtakingly witty and virtuosic comedy, set in a small New England college town. Traversing the experiences of women across the generations, this play is a hugely entertaining exploration of a new style of feminism, ripe for the twenty-first century.Rapture, Blister, Burn was commissioned by Playwrights Horizons, where it premiered, with funds from the Harold and Mim Steinberg Charitable Trust. It received its UK premiere at the Hampstead Theatre, London, in January 2014.

  • In the Next Room (or the vibrator play)

    In the Next Room (or the vibrator play)
    Sarah Ruhl

    The first collection by a striking new voice in the American theater.

  • Moonlight and Magnolias

    Moonlight and Magnolias
    Ron Hutchinson

    ‘There’s your first problem. No Civil War movie ever made a dime. Or ever will.’ Hollywood, 1939: semi-independent mogul David O. Selznick has just shut down production on the most eagerly anticipated movie in history – his megabudget version of Margaret Mitchell’s bestselling novel Gone With The Wind – scrapping the original script and sacking the director in the process. Determined to produce a rewrite in five days, he engages the reluctant services of ace script doctor Ben Hecht – possibly the only person in America who has not read the novel – and the movie’s new director Victor Fleming, poached straight from the set of The Wizard of Oz, where he had been squabbling with the Munchkins and coming to blows with Judy Garland. His reputation on the line, Selznick locks himself in his office with his two collaborators, with nothing but a stockpile of peanuts and bananas to sustain them, and a marathon creative session begins…

  • Complete Works of William Shakespeare: Complete Comedies, Histories, Tragedies and Poems

    Complete Works of William Shakespeare: Complete Comedies, Histories, Tragedies and Poems
    William Shakespeare

    Complete Collection of William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, Tragedies and Poems What's Included: THE COMEDIES All's Well That Ends Well As You Like It The Comedy of Errors Cymbeline, King of Britain Love's Labour's Lost Measure for Measure The Merchant of Venice The Merry Wives of Windsor A Midsummer Night's Dream Much Ado About Nothing Pericles, Prince of Tyre The Taming of the Shrew The Tempest Troilus and Cressida Twelfth Night The Two Gentlemen of Verona The Winter's Tale THE HISTORIES The First Part of Henry the Fourth The Second Part of Henry the Fourth The Life of Henry the Fifth The First Part of Henry the Sixth The Second Part of Henry the Sixth The Third Part of Henry the Sixth The Famous History of the Life of King Henry the Eighth The Life and Death of King John The Life and Death of King Richard the Second The Life of Richard the Third THE TRAGEDIES Antony and Cleopatra Coriolanus Hamlet Julius Caesar King Lear Macbeth Othello Romeo and Juliet Timon of Athens Titus Andronicus THE POEMS A Lover's Complaint The Rape Of Lucrece Venus and Adonis A Funeral Elegy for Master William Peter THE COMPLETE SONNETS This version has been optimized for readability and includes: BEAUTIFUL FORMATTING There is plenty of white-space which makes reading easy on the eyes. FULLY FEATURED TABLE OF CONTENTS The full Table of Contents appears at the beginning of the book and can be accessed through the MENU or GO TO button. EPUBCHECK The book successfully passes EpubCheck, developed by the IDPF. The International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF) is the global trade and standards organization dedicated to the development and promotion of electronic publishing and content consumption.

  • Anthony: A Play in Five Acts

    Anthony: A Play in Five Acts
    Alexandre Dumas

    Anthony is injured saving a beautiful girl–but can he win her love? The best-known play by French historical novelist Alexandre Dumas, translated for the first time into English.

  • Titus Andronicus: A Tragedy

    Titus Andronicus: A Tragedy
    William Shakespeare

    In 4th Century Rome, Titus returns to the city after a period of bloody conflicts with the Goths. Upon his triumphant return with his prisoners—the Goth queen Tamora and her three sons—the opposing parties begin a cycle of revenge that ultimate destroys them all. Long assumed to be one of Shakespeare’s earliest tragedies, Titus Andronicus was one of the most popular of his plays to be performed during his lifetime.Known as “The Bard of Avon,” William Shakespeare is arguably the greatest English-language writer known. Enormously popular during his life, Shakespeare’s works continue to resonate more than three centuries after his death, as has his influence on theatre and literature. Shakespeare’s innovative use of character, language, and experimentation with romance as tragedy served as a foundation for later playwrights and dramatists, and some of his most famous lines of dialogue have become part of everyday speech.HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

  • William Shakespeare: The Complete Works: Edition 2

    William Shakespeare: The Complete Works: Edition 2
    William Shakespeare

    The second Oxford edition of Shakespeare's Complete Works reconsiders every detail of their text and presentation in the light of modern scholarship. The nature and authority of the early documents are re-examined, and the canon and chronological order of composition freshly established. Spelling and punctuation are modernized, and there is a brief introduction to each work, as well as an illuminating and informative General Introduction. Included here for the first time is the play The Reign of King Edward the Third as well as the full text of Sir Thomas More. This new edition also features an essay on Shakespeare's language by David Crystal, and a bibliography of foundational works.