List books in category Medicine / Caregiving

  • The Alzheimer s Sourcebook for Caregivers

    The Alzheimer’s Sourcebook for Caregivers
    Frena Gray-Davidson

    Provides comprehensive information on how to cope with the painful personal issues & dilemmas Alzheimer's brings & how to anticipate challenges for both caregiver & patient. This is an in-depth sourcebook designed as a compassionate tool for the caregivers of Alzheimer's sufferers. It covers the essentials of caregiving on a daily basis and provides tips for coping with problems and difficult behaviour.

  • When Someone You Know Has Dementia: Practical Advice for Families and Caregivers

    When Someone You Know Has Dementia: Practical Advice for Families and Caregivers
    June Andrews

    Across the world, almost 50 million people have dementia. Hundreds of millions of people are affected by the dementia of parents, partners, siblings, or friends. And while many countries are learning to cope with aging populations, dementia is becoming ever more of a challenge for many societies and individuals.Huge numbers of people who are diagnosed, or who are dealing with the diagnosis of a loved one, feel alone. When Someone You Know Has Dementia aims to fill this gap, providing practical information and support for people living with, or caring for someone with, dementia. It also provides insight into what is happening when a person has dementia as well as describing what dementia is, how you can deal with it, and what you can do to keep dementia at bay. Because the book offers information that has been unavailable to nurses and doctors, clinicians will also find it helpful.Most important, the book takes an honest approach, emphasizing the needs of the person who has Alzheimer’s or dementia while also giving attention to the needs of caregivers and families. The book is packed with practical tips for providing what people with Alzheimer’s or dementia want and need and includes many quotes from people living with or affected by dementia. With clear and sensible information about recognizing symptoms, getting help, managing financially, staying at home, getting treatment, being a caregiver, and staying positive, this guide will help people with dementia and their families make sure that they can stay well and happy as long as possible.

  • The Dementia Caregiver: A Guide to Caring for Someone with Alzheimer s Disease and Other Neurocognitive Disorders

    The Dementia Caregiver: A Guide to Caring for Someone with Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Neurocognitive Disorders
    Marc E. Agronin

    Becoming a caregiver for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or another neurocognitive disorder can be an unexpected, undesirable, underappreciated—and yet noble role. It is heartbreaking to watch someone lose the very cognitive capacities that once helped to define them as a person. But because of the nature of these disorders, the only way to become an effective caregiver and cope with the role’s many daily challenges is to become well-informed about the disease. With the right information, resources and tips on caregiving and working with professionals, you can become your own expert at both caring for your charge and taking care of yourself. In these pages, Marc Agronin guides readers through a better understanding of the changes their loved one may be going through, and helps them tap into the various resources available to them as they embark on an uncertain caregiving journey. Insisting that a caregiver also maintain his or her own health and well being, Agronin guides caregivers in their efforts to provide care, but to also look to themselves as recipients of care from themselves and others. Shedding light on the debilitating disorders themselves as well as their everyday realities, this book is a much-needed resource for anyone caring for another person suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and other neurocognitive disorders.

  • Spiritual Care in Common Terms: How Chaplains Can Effectively Describe the Spiritual Needs of Patients in Medical Records

    Spiritual Care in Common Terms: How Chaplains Can Effectively Describe the Spiritual Needs of Patients in Medical Records
    Gordon J. Hilsman, D.Min

    Encouraging a broad, compassionate, humanistic approach to spirituality, this book shows how patients' spiritual needs can be communicated well within interdisciplinary teams, leading to better patient wellbeing.This book describes the art of charting patients' spiritual perspectives in an open way that will help physicians and nurses to better direct medical care. It includes practical information on how to distil spiritual needs into pragmatic language, helping to demystify spiritual experience. Drawing on his extensive practical experience, the author also suggests key points to emphasise that will enrich chart notes for medical records, including brief, relative narratives, trusting one's own impressions, reflecting holistically on the patient's life, patient attitudes towards treatment and recovery, and describing families' opinions on the health care situation of their loved one. The book shows healthcare professionals of all disciplines how to engage in a shared responsibility for the spiritual care of their patients.

  • The Selfish Pig s Guide To Caring: How to Cope With the Emotional and Practical Aspects of Caring for Someone

    The Selfish Pig’s Guide To Caring: How to Cope With the Emotional and Practical Aspects of Caring for Someone
    Hugh Marriott

    Six million people in the UK, often unnoticed by the rest of us, provide unpaid care for disabled or elderly relatives, friends or neighbours. Their job is long, lonely and hard, yet there is limited support and no formal training. As a result, carers suffer frequent damage to physical and mental health.Oddly, though carers by definition are anything but selfish pigs, they are liable to feelings of guilt, probably brought on by fatigue and isolation. So Hugh Marriott has written this book for them – and also for the rest of us who don't know what being a carer is all about. His aim is bring into the open everything he wishes he'd been told when he first became a carer. And he does. The book airs such topics as sex, thoughts of murder, and dealing with the responses of friends and officials who fail to understand.This is a must-read for anyone involved with caring.

  • Hearts of Wisdom: American Women Caring for Kin, 1850-1940

    Hearts of Wisdom: American Women Caring for Kin, 1850-1940
    Emily K. Abel

    The image of the female caregiver holding a midnight vigil at the bedside of a sick relative is so firmly rooted in our collective imagination we might assume that such caregiving would have attracted the scrutiny of numerous historians. As Emily Abel demonstrates in this groundbreaking study of caregiving in America across class and ethnic divides and over the course of ninety years, this has hardly been the case. While caring for sick and disabled family members was commonplace for women in nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century America, that caregiving, the caregivers' experience of it, and the medical profession's reaction to it took diverse and sometimes unexpected forms. A complex series of historical changes, Abel shows, has profoundly altered the content and cultural meaning of care. Hearts of Wisdom is an immersion into that "world of care." Drawing on antebellum slave narratives, white farm women's diaries, and public health records, Abel puts together a multifaceted picture of what caregiving meant to American women–and what it cost them–from the pre-Civil War years to the brink of America's entry into the Second World War. She shows that caregiving offered women an arena in which experience could be parlayed into expertise, while at the same time the revolution in bacteriology and the transformation of the formal health care system were weakening women's claim to that expertise.Table of Contents: Acknowledgments Introduction Part One: 1850-1890 1. "Hot Flannels, Hot Teas, and a Great Deal of Care": Emily Hawley Gillespie and Sarah Gillespie, 1858-1888 2. An Overview of Nineteenth-Century Caregiving 3. "Tried at the Quilting Bees": Con'icts between "Old Ladies" and Aspiring Professionals Part Two: 1890-1940 4. A "Terrible and Exhausting" Struggle: Martha Shaw Farnsworth, 1890-1924 5. "Just as You Direct": Caregiver Translations of Medical Authority 6. Negotiating Public Health Directives: Poor New Yorkers at the Turn of the Century Reviews of this book: This excellent historical review of female caregiving within families as a transformative experience identifies conditions that make this form of human connectedness rewarding and meaningful.–J.E. Thompson, ChoiceThis is a breathtaking work in terms of its depth and its breadth. Emily Abel's research is impressive in its time frame, wide range of topics, and wonderful source material. What she has given us, for the first time, is a full-length study of the female support network, not only for childbirth but for a whole range of health issues. With her pleasing writing style and clear, readable prose, she gives us much more than mere glimpses of anonymous people–she provides the reader with a sense of the texture of human lives.–Susan L. Smith, University of AlbertaThe reader of Hearts of Wisdom is surprised by the topic and content, but is left with the sense that the most central story of human possibility has been left out of all other history books. The work offers a substantive contribution to history, feminist scholarship, caregiving professions, and informal caregivers.–Patricia Benner, R.N., Ph.D, University of California, San Francisco

  • The Language of Kindness: A Nurse s Story

    The Language of Kindness: A Nurse’s Story
    Christie Watson

    #1 International BestsellerA moving, lyrical, beautifully-written portrait of a nurse and the lives she has touched Christie Watson spent twenty years as a nurse, and in this intimate, poignant, and remarkably powerful book, she opens the doors of the hospital and shares its secrets. She takes us by her side down hospital corridors to visit the wards and meet her unforgettable patients. In the neonatal unit, premature babies fight for their lives, hovering at the very edge of survival, like tiny Emmanuel, wrapped up in a sandwich bag. On the cancer wards, the nurses administer chemotherapy and, long after the medicine stops working, something more important–which Watson learns to recognize when her own father is dying of cancer. In the pediatric intensive care unit, the nurses wash the hair of a little girl to remove the smell of smoke from the house fire. The emergency room is overcrowded as ever, with waves of alcohol and drug addicted patients as well as patients like Betty, a widow suffering chest pain, frail and alone. And the stories of the geriatric ward–Gladys and older patients like her–show the plight of the most vulnerable members of our society. Through the smallest of actions, nurses provide vital care and kindness. All of us will experience illness in our lifetime, and we will all depend on the support and dignity that nurses offer us; yet the women and men who form the vanguard of our health care remain unsung. In this age of fear, hate, and division, Christie Watson has written a book that reminds us of all that we share, and of the urgency of compassion.

  • Caregiver s Handbook: A Practical, Visual Guide for the Home Caregiver

    Caregiver’s Handbook: A Practical, Visual Guide for the Home Caregiver
    DK

    The Caregiver's Handbook is a definitive guide to caring for a sick or disabled person of any age. Whether it be adults looking after parents, partners looking after each other, parents looking after children, or young caregivers looking after their parents, the Caregiver's Handbook addresses both the needs of the caregiver, and person who needs care.The Caregiver's Handbook offers emotional support and practical advice on a wide range of topics, enabling individuals to provide the best care possible-whatever the requirements. Everyday concerns, including healthy eating, personal care, and rest and sleep, are addressed alongside topics such as safe movement and handling, choosing the right stability aids, or even how to maneuver a wheelchair for the first time. Features also include a look at how either at the needs of the caregiver, or how the requirement of specific conditions-such as dementia or physical impairment-can affect the way a task can be approached.The Caregiver's Handbook is a comprehensive, compassionate, and indispensable resource that all caregivers will want to have on hand at all times – it is essential reading for anyone caring for someone at home.

  • Making Health Care Whole: Integrating Spirituality into Patient Care

    Making Health Care Whole: Integrating Spirituality into Patient Care
    Christina Puchalski

    In the last fifteen years, the field of palliative care has experienced a surge in interest in spirituality as an important aspect of caring for seriously ill and dying patients. While spirituality has been generally recognized as an essential dimension of palliative care, uniformity of spiritual care practice has been lacking across health care settings due to factors like varying understandings and definitions of spirituality, lack of resources and practical tools, and limited professional education and training in spiritual care. In order to address these shortcomings, more than forty spiritual and palliative care experts gathered for a national conference to discuss guidelines for incorporating spirituality into palliative care. Their consensus findings form the basis of Making Health Care Whole. This important new resource provides much-needed definitions and charts a common language for addressing spiritual care across the disciplines of medicine, nursing, social work, chaplaincy, psychology, and other groups. It presents models of spiritual care that are broad and inclusive, and provides tools for screening, assessment, care planning, and interventions. This book also advocates a team approach to spiritual care, and specifies the roles of each professional on the team. Serving as both a scholarly review of the field as well as a practical resource with specific recommendations to improve spiritual care in clinical practice, Making Health Care Whole will benefit hospices and palliative care programs in hospitals, home care services, and long-term care services. It will also be a valuable addition to the curriculum at seminaries, schools of theology, and medical and nursing schools.

  • The Eldercare Handbook: Difficult Choices, Compassionate Solutions

    The Eldercare Handbook: Difficult Choices, Compassionate Solutions
    Stella Henry

    In this comprehensive and accessible guide, long-term care expert Stella Henry helps readers navigate the daunting logistics and powerful emotions of making care decisions for an elderly parent or loved one. Drawing from her 36 years as a registered nurse and a nursing home administrator, as well as her experience caring for both her parents (both of whom suffered the ravages of Alzheimer's disease), Henry tackles all the tough issues: spotting the warning signs of dementia, redefining sibling roles, doing a walk-through at an assisted living facility or nursing home, making the move, and coping with "take me home!" demands.She also explains the medical, legal, and insurance maze. In a time when almost 10 million Americans currently need long-term care, The Eldercare Handbook is an essential read.

  • Breaking the Silence, Little Prisoners and Mummy’s Little Helper 3-in-1 Collection

    Breaking the Silence, Little Prisoners and Mummy’s Little Helper 3-in-1 Collection
    Casey Watson

    Sunday Times bestselling author and foster carer Casey Watson’s inspiring memoirs Mummy’s Little Helper and Little Prisoners combined in a single volume with her deeply moving latest title Breaking the Silence, about two troubled little boys who both desperately need a loving home, and find comfort and friendship in the most unlikely of places. Breaking the Silence is the true story of Jenson, a nine-year-old boy who has been left home alone while his mother goes on holiday, and Georgie, who has been living in a children’s home since he was a toddler and is autistic. Both boys are about to become members of the Watson family and test Casey to her limits. Are their differences unreconcilable? When Casey takes in two innocent and frightened ‘unfosterable’ children who do not know what it means to be loved in Little Prisoners, she is shocked by the levels of neglect that the pair have been subjected to. Casey is desperate to help these poor, lost children, who have been taken away from their family because they were considered at risk, but before she can even start to understand the horrific things that have happened in the past, she has to teach them the most basic of behaviours. Ten-year-old Abigail is Mummy’s Little Helper, a child left to cope alone since she was 3 with her mother who has progressive multiple sclerosis. She’s suddenly no longer invisible to the care system, and needs support, but the emotional strain of her total change in circumstances starts to show when she arrives at Casey’s home. She doesn’t know how to cope without huge burdening responsibility. Casey is determined to find solution for this brave girl.

  • Children as Caregivers: The Global Fight against Tuberculosis and HIV in Zambia

    Children as Caregivers: The Global Fight against Tuberculosis and HIV in Zambia
    Jean Hunleth

    In Zambia, due to the rise of tuberculosis and the closely connected HIV epidemic, a large number of children have experienced the illness or death of at least one parent. Children as Caregivers examines how well intentioned practitioners fail to realize that children take on active caregiving roles when their guardians become seriously ill and demonstrates why understanding children’s care is crucial for global health policy. Using ethnographic methods, and listening to the voices of the young as well as adults, Jean Hunleth makes the caregiving work of children visible. She shows how children actively seek to “get closer” to ill guardians by providing good care. Both children and ill adults define good care as attentiveness of the young to adults’ physical needs, the ability to carry out treatment and medication programs in the home, and above all, the need to maintain physical closeness and proximity. Children understand that losing their guardians will not only be emotionally devastating, but that such loss is likely to set them adrift in Zambian society, where education and advancement depend on maintaining familial, reciprocal relationships. View a gallery of images from the book (https://www.flickr.com/photos/childrenascaregivers)

  • The Handholder s Handbook: A Guide to Caregivers of People with Alzheimer s Or Other Dementias

    The Handholder’s Handbook: A Guide to Caregivers of People with Alzheimer’s Or Other Dementias
    Rosette Teitel

    Annotation According to the Alzheimer's Association, one in ten persons over sixty-five and nearly half of those over eighty-five have Alzheimer's disease. Today, 4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. In a national survey, 19 million Americans said they have a family member with the ailment, and 37 million said they knew someone who had it. But when Rosette Teitel found herself in the role of caregiver to her ailing husband, she could find no books that answered her practical needs: How do you give a 170-pound man a shower? How do you pick him up when he falls? What should you anticipate as the disease progresses? What support networks are available? When is it time to consider a nursing home and how do you find one?While many Alzheimer's disease books focus on the disease and the patient, Teitel draws on her own experience — as well as that of a clinical psychologist, a coordinator of an Alzheimer's program at a community center, members of the Alzheimer's Foundation, a research psychologist, an elder-law, attorney, and a neurologist — to tackle subjects rarely dealt with in other self-help books. Teitel covers topics such as managing the expenses of long-term care through Medicaid, estate planning, and preparing for the patient's death and the loss of someone whose daily survival has been at the center of one's existence. The chapters deal with background information on diagnosis, treatment, and the progression of the disease; the physical and emotional changes and resources involved with the day-to-day caregiving; support networks; nursing homes; finances; death of the patient; grief, mourning, and life after the patient's death; and interviews with children caring for parents withAlzheimer's disease. In addition, Teitel provides a helpful list of frequently asked questions, scheduling and memory aids, and websites where readers can find resources.

  • 7 Caregiver Landmines: And How You Can Avoid Them

    7 Caregiver Landmines: And How You Can Avoid Them
    Peter W. Rosenberger

    A caregiver’s journey often contains beliefs and behaviors that act like emotional landmines and can cause serious damage. Avoiding these landmines, while finding a path to safety, requires caregivers to hear from someone with experience they can trust. Author and radio host Peter Rosenberger draws upon three decades of caring for his wife through a medical nightmare to discuss seven caregiver landmines that wreak havoc in a caregiver’s life. Helping them navigate to a place of safety, 7 Caregiver Landmines: And How You Can Avoid Them equips fellow caregivers to live a healthier, calmer, and even more joyful life—because "Healthy Caregivers Make Better Caregivers!"

  • Raising Generation Rx: Mothering Kids with Invisible Disabilities in an Age of Inequality

    Raising Generation Rx: Mothering Kids with Invisible Disabilities in an Age of Inequality
    Linda M. Blum

    Winner, 2016 Outstanding Publication in the Sociology of Disability, American Sociological Association, Section Disability and SocietyRecent years have seen an explosion in the number of children diagnosed with “invisible disabilities” such as ADHD, mood and conduct disorders, and high-functioning autism spectrum disorders. Whether they are viewed as biological problems in brain wiring or as results of the increasing medicalization of childhood, the burden of dealing with the day-to-day trials and complex medical and educational decisions falls almost entirely on mothers. Yet few ask how these mothers make sense of their children’s troubles, and to what extent they feel responsibility or blame. Raising Generation Rx offers a groundbreaking study that situates mothers’ experiences within an age of neuroscientific breakthrough, a high-stakes knowledge-based economy, cutbacks in public services and decent jobs, and increased global competition and racialized class and gender inequality. Through in-depth interviews, observations of parents’ meetings, and analyses of popular advice, Linda Blum examines the experiences of diverse mothers coping with the challenges of their children’s “invisible disabilities” in the face of daunting social, economic, and political realities. She reveals how mothers in widely varied households learn to advocate for their children in the dense bureaucracies of the educational and medical systems; wrestle with anguishing decisions about the use of psychoactive medications; and live with the inescapable blame and stigma in their communities.

  • Dr Ruth s Guide for the Alzheimer s Caregiver: How to Care for Your Loved One without Getting Overwhelmed...and without Doing It All Yourself

    Dr Ruth’s Guide for the Alzheimer’s Caregiver: How to Care for Your Loved One without Getting Overwhelmed…and without Doing It All Yourself
    Dr. Ruth K. Westheimer

    Dr. Ruth, a trusted name in relationship therapy, presents effective coping strategies for both the practical problems and emotional stresses of Alzheimer's care. More than 15 million Americans are responsible for the care of a loved one with Alzheimer's disease, a situation that can quickly lead to feeling overwhelmed while trying to balance between the full-time needs of a dependent adult and the caregiver's own physical and mental health. The tactics and resources presented in this book build confidence in the caregiver and provide health-guided advice on how to avoid burnout, seek support from family and friends, resolve family disputes, maintain a loving relationship with a spouse or parent with Alzheimer's, manage behavior, and make the home a safe environment. Keeping the best interests of everyone involved in mind, the guide also details how to coordinate effectively with doctors, facilities, and other care providers.

  • Meaning in Suffering: Caring Practices in the Health Professions

    Meaning in Suffering: Caring Practices in the Health Professions
    Nancy Johnston

    Compelling, timely, and essential reading for healthcare providers, Meaning in Suffering addresses the multiplicity of meanings suffering brings to all it touches: patients, families, health workers, and human science professionals. Examining suffering in writing that is both methodologically rigorous and accessible, the contributors preserve first-hand experiences using narrative ethnography, existential hermeneutics, hermeneutic phenomenology, and traditional ethnography. They offer nuanced insights into suffering as a human condition experienced by persons deserving of dignity, empathy, and understanding. Collectively, these essays demonstrate that understanding the suffering of the "other" reveals something vital about the moral courage required to heal—and stay humane—in the face of suffering. Winner, Nursing Research Category, American Journal of Nursing

  • Beauty in the Broken Places: A Memoir of Love, Faith, and Resilience

    Beauty in the Broken Places: A Memoir of Love, Faith, and Resilience
    Allison Pataki

    “An inspiring, intimate memoir about faith, resilience and the tenacity of love.”—People“In this emotional tale, a young couple see their lives changed in the blink of an eye—and learn to find love again.”—US Weekly Five months pregnant, on a flight to their “babymoon,” Allison Pataki turned to her husband when he asked if his eye looked strange and watched him suddenly lose consciousness. After an emergency landing, she discovered that Dave—a healthy thirty-year-old athlete and surgical resident—had suffered a rare and life-threatening stroke. Next thing Allison knew, she was sitting alone in the ER in Fargo, North Dakota, waiting to hear if her husband would survive the night. When Dave woke up, he could not carry memories from hour to hour, much less from one day to the next. Allison had lost the Dave she knew and loved when he lost consciousness on the plane. Within a few months, she found herself caring for both a newborn and a sick husband, struggling with the fear of what was to come. As a way to make sense of the pain and chaos of their new reality, Allison started to write daily letters to Dave. Not only would she work to make sense of the unfathomable experiences unfolding around her, but her letters would provide Dave with the memories he could not make on his own. She was writing to preserve their past, protect their present, and fight for their future. Those letters became the foundation of this beautiful, intimate memoir. And in the process, she fell in love with her husband all over again. This is a manifesto for living, an ultimately uplifting story about the transformative power of faith and resilience. It’s a tale of a man’s turbulent road to recovery, the shifting nature of marriage, and the struggle of loving through pain and finding joy in the broken places.Praise for Beauty in the Broken Places“Bold and commendable . . . A strength of this memoir is [Allison Pataki’s] scrupulous honesty.”—USA Today“A memoir about . . . determination and gratitude, and the value of putting one foot in front of another during a crisis.”—The Washington Post “Heart-wrenching.”—Women’s Health“Powerful and immersive . . . Pataki delivers an insightful look at how two people faced a life-altering test as a team ‘fighting to make the dreams of our future possible.’”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

  • Learning to Speak Alzheimer s: A Groundbreaking Approach for Everyone Dealing with the Disease

    Learning to Speak Alzheimer’s: A Groundbreaking Approach for Everyone Dealing with the Disease
    Joanne Koenig Coste

    More than four million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s, and as many as twenty million have close relatives or friends with the disease. Revolutionizing the way we perceive and live with Alzheimer’s, Joanne Koenig Coste offers a practical approach to the emotional well-being of both patients and caregivers that emphasizes relating to patients in their own reality. Her accessible and comprehensive method, which she calls habilitation, works to enhance communication between carepartners and patients and has proven successful with thousands of people living with dementia. Learning to Speak Alzheimer’s also offers hundreds of practical tips, including how to: · cope with the diagnosis and adjust to the disease’s progression · help the patient talk about the illness · face the issue of driving · make meals and bath times as pleasant as possible · adjust room design for the patient’s comfort · deal with wandering, paranoia, and aggression

  • Killer Care: How Medical Error Became America s Third Largest Cause of Death, and What Can Be Done About It

    Killer Care: How Medical Error Became America’s Third Largest Cause of Death, and What Can Be Done About It
    James B. Lieber

    “A succinct, disturbing report on the prevalence of malpractice in modern medicine. ….An imperative analysis that begs for discussion by industry watchdogs and consumers alike.” —Kirkus Reviews“Brilliant…scholarly. A reading of Killer Care makes an immediate personal investment in our own safer patient-centered care logical and worthwhile. …Killer Care is strongly advised.” —T. Michael White, M.D., former VP and clinical professor of medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; author, Unsafe to Safe“In Killer Care, James Lieber uncovers systemic failures and lack of safeguards in patient safety. His wake-up call not only informs, but provides specific and actionable recommendations for patients and their families. His analysis also points to system fixes that will make being a patient safer for all of us.” —Barbara Mittleman, M.D.; former director, Program on Private-Public Partnerships, Office of Science Policy, National institutes of Health (2006-2012)Each year in the U.S., a quarter of a million deaths are attributable to medical error. If the number shocks, on some level you already knew it was so. Everyone knows someone—perhaps it was yourself—who has suffered miserable treatment in American hospitals, part of the most elaborate, most extensive and expensive health care system in the world. But it is perhaps the most inefficient.Misdiagnoses, wrong prescriptions, operating on the wrong patient, even operating on the wrong limb (and amputating it): these are the consequences of rampant carelessness, overwork, ignorance, and hospitals trying to get the most out of their caregivers and the most money out of their patients.What are we to do? Killer Care lays out the very real danger each of us faces whenever we enter a hospital. But more than that, it spells out what we can do to mitigate that risk. The book is also the story of the remarkable heroes fighting this plague of medical errors—patients and their families, but also doctors and nurses. Starting about twenty years ago, a number of victims and even some perpetrators of these errors began a social movement that offers us vital protections when we are most vulnerable: they have begun a cultural shift that is transforming every facet of health care.

  • Decision Assessment and Counseling in Abortion Care: Philosophy and Practice

    Decision Assessment and Counseling in Abortion Care: Philosophy and Practice
    Alissa C. Perrucci

    In today’s contentious political environment surrounding abortion, clinicians, counselors and social workers need a clear framework for providing skilled, compassionate decision counseling. They need help working with the hard stuff: “What do I do when my patient asks me if God will forgive her?” or “What do I say when a woman says that she feels like she’s killing her baby?” These are the questions asked by clinicians and mental health professionals everywhere; these are also the questions for which this book offers answers. The fields of healthcare and counseling psychology have long-awaited a manual for conducting pregnancy decision counseling across the spectrum of patient issues, employee skill levels, and clinic resources. Using case examples, individual and group exercises, guided self-reflection, and values clarification, the reader will develop the necessary skills to provide compassionate and informed pregnancy decision counseling. This book will define the gold standard for decision assessment and counseling for all pregnancy options and will be cited as the definitive guide for learning, teaching, and providing high-quality, compassionate counseling in abortion and family planning clinics nationwide.

  • Death in Slow Motion: A Memoir of a Daughter, Her Mother, and the Beast Called Alzheimer s

    Death in Slow Motion: A Memoir of a Daughter, Her Mother, and the Beast Called Alzheimer’s
    Eleanor Cooney

    When her once-glamorous and witty novelist-mother got Alzheimer's, Eleanor Cooney moved her from her beloved Connecticut home to California in order to care for her. In tense, searing prose, punctuated with the blackest of humor, Cooney documents the slow erosion of her mother's mind, the powerful bond the two shared, and her own descent into drink and despair.But the coping mechanism that finally serves this eloquent writer best is writing, the ability to bring to vivid life the memories her mother is losing. As her mother gropes in the gathering darkness for a grip on the world she once loved, succeeding only in conjuring sad fantasies of places and times with her late husband, Cooney revisits their true past. Death in Slow Motion becomes the mesmerizing story of Eleanor's actual childhood, straight out of the pages of John Cheever; the daring and vibrant mother she remembers; and a time that no longer exists for either of them.

  • Blood, Sweat and Tears — Becoming a Better Surgeon

    Blood, Sweat and Tears — Becoming a Better Surgeon
    Philip F. Stahel

    All surgeons want to be better surgeons… They work hard to be respected by their peers, appreciated by their patients, and valued by their communities. Most of the estimated 200 million surgeries performed worldwide every year go as anticipated, with positive patient outcomes. However, the number of surgical complications and preventable medical errors still remains unacceptably high. Why are experienced surgeons still creating so many adverse events? More importantly, what can surgeons do to better address the situation? Blood, Sweat and Tears — Becoming a Better Surgeon seeks to answer these questions. The book provides pragmatic examples on how good surgeons can grow from being technically brilliant to becoming empathetic and capable of providing safe, compassionate, and more effective patient care. Blood, Sweat and Tears — Becoming a Better Surgeon follows trauma surgeon Philip Stahel's 20-year journey from his 'rookie years' in internship and residency, to his development as a global patient safety advocate, renowned academician and teacher, and compassionate surgeon. The book touches on why our current patient safety protocols and checklists fail to keep patients safe and how a physician-driven initiative with credible leadership is needed to build a sustainable 'culture of patient safety.' Written for a wide audience and based on the paradigm that “good judgment comes from experience which comes from poor judgment”, Blood, Sweat and Tears — Becoming a Better Surgeon provides in-depth coverage of all the critical and timely components of safe surgical care, relates practical tips for improving the quality of partnerships between surgeons and patients, and offers a practical guide on how to reduce the learning curve to becoming a better surgeon. Reviews 1) I applaud Dr. Stahel for presenting a rich compilation of his honest and remarkable first-hand experiences and the collective work of doctors and health care leaders to reduce the endemic variation in medical quality that contributes to the #3 cause of death in the U.S. today — medical care itself. Marty Makary MD, Author of The New York Times bestseller, Unaccountable 2) “Blood, Sweat & Tears” is a great book, one of a kind, and destined to be a medical classic. What makes the book exceptional is the narrative about a difficult human endeavor, often done imperfectly, by humans who have been told they should be ‘perfect’. This quintessential paradox is why this book is a practical story about life and will likely be of interest and enjoyment to many outside the realm of medicine. Wade Smith MD, Co-founding Editor, Patient Safety in Surgery 3) Blood, Sweat & Tears: How to Become a Better Surgeon is a remarkable book that emphasizes empathy and communication, provocatively authored by a surgeon. However, as the reader will soon discover, Philip Stahel is not your ordinary surgeon. I strongly recommend every health care provider read this book. I further recommend this book be mandatory reading annually for every medical student, intern, resident and fellow-in-training, most especially chapters 3 and 4, which epitomize William Osler's advice, "Listen to the patient – he is telling you the diagnosis". In these 20 chapters, the many other insightful quotes alone are worth the purchase price. Jerome M.Buckley, MD Retired CEO/Chairman, COPIC Companies Associate Clinical Professor, University of Colorado School of Medicine 4) The life of a surgeon is difficult. Life and limb threatening problems do not necessarily occur at convenient times. Surgery is not for the weak as it requires physical strength, emotional stamina, and unquenchable intellectual curiosity. Underneath these prerequisites lies the most important of all surgical requirements: the patient. With his emphasis on patient care found through empathy, shared decision making, and attention to detail, Dr. Stahel is telling the surgeon of today and tomorrow about the way to quality improvement and self-fulfillment. The emphasis on empathy is a crucial but neglected part of quality improvement. Why do our patients so frequently not adhere to our instructions? Putting yourself in the patient's position creates an essential surgeon-patient bond that underlies an optimal outcome. Dr. Stahel did not write the golden rule of "love thy neighbor as thyself", but it is clear that he sees this as an essential part of the surgeon-patient partnership. Both surgeon and patient will feel this effect, and it will pay dividends for both parties in the near and distant future. It is an important but disturbing reflection that many medical students lose their empathetic qualities during their clerkship years. There are many reasons that underlie this loss including our role models, the frantic pace of clinical activities, and the lack of clear direction as to the medical student role. Importantly, Dr. Stahel gives us a path to finding our empathy by rediscovering our humanism. Relating to the janitor, the nurse, and other members of the care team as people is an important first step in understanding the common ground that we share with our patients. Letting each member of the surgical team call the professor by his first name clearly tells the staff that all are important and essential. Giving his phone number to his patients shows the trust that Dr. Stahel shares with those who trust him. As I reflect upon my own 35-year career in surgery, I remember the eagerness with which I first approached operating room days. "A chance to cut is a chance to cure" and "the only way to heal is with cold steel" were chants that my fellow residents and I would often repeat. The operating room was its own sanctuary away from many realities of patient care. With time, I have learned to appreciate other parts of patient care. In the clinic, I have a chance to know the patient as a person, and I have an opportunity to educate the patient as I would want to be educated. My path to becoming a better surgeon is far from over but my time to accomplish this is short. I truly wish that I had read such a book many decades ago as I began my life in surgery, but back then no such work was available. With Blood, Sweat, & Tears, Dr. Stahel has directed me to some needed tools that might help me reach this laudatory goal of ongoing quality improvement. I am most appreciative for his reflections and observations, and I remain hopeful that perhaps someday I might become a better surgeon. Ted Clarke, MD Orthopaedic Surgeon and CEO and Chairman of COPIC, Denver, Colorado 5) As a veteran Registered Nurse I feel that this book is a must read for anyone in health care! Dr. Philip Stahel has a very down to Earth writing style and compassionate approach to patient care. Reading this book has reinvigorated my love of nursing and passion for patient care. Kerry Olson, RN 6) Blood, Sweat & Tears is a unique book – clearly one of a kind, and surprisingly not just of interest to those who work in healthcare. The book has a captivating narrative flow and the medical aspects are very easy to understand for non-clinical/laypersons as well. I will be sending my "baby boomer" parents a copy as it becoming increasingly important for the community to understand the complexity and challenges of our current healthcare system. My take-home point from this book is that we can and we should be involved in our healthcare choices and ask important and pertinent questions. If you're like me, and you're interested in patient safety and eventually receiving high quality medical care if you ever become a patient, if you have a sense of humor, and you would like a different perspective on healthcare, this is the book for you! Nicole Morgan, MHA

  • Animal-Assisted Therapy

    Animal-Assisted Therapy
    Donald Altschiller

    The use of animals for therapy is a burgeoning form of treatment for individuals with physical, emotional, or psychological illnesses. Written for students and general readers, Animal-Assisted Therapy offers a historical overview of the practice, detailing its growth and the many ways it is practiced today. Filled with illustrative examples, such as successful programs where children with reading problems read aloud to canine companions, the book illuminates the expansive nature and effectiveness of this therapy as it is practiced both generally and among special populations, including children, the elderly, autistic individuals, and the incarcerated. The book also provides specific information that will be of interest to pet owners who want to get involved in these programs and includes information on U.S. government requirements allowing guide dogs in public and private facilities.

  • The Burden of Sympathy: How Families Cope With Mental Illness

    The Burden of Sympathy: How Families Cope With Mental Illness
    David A. Karp

    What are the limits of sympathy in dealing with another person's troubles? Where do we draw the line between caring for a loved one, and being swallowed up emotionally by the obligation to do so? Quite simply, what do we owe each other? In this vivid and thoughtful study, David Karp chronicles the experiences of the family members of the mentally ill, and how they draw "boundaries of sympathy" to avoid being engulfed by the day-to-day suffering of a loved one. Working from sixty extensive interviews, the author reveals striking similarities in the experiences of caregivers: the feelings of shame, fear, guilt and powerlessness in the face of a socially stigmatized illness; the frustration of navigating the complex network of bureaucracies that govern the mental health system; and most of all, the difficulty negotiating an "appropriate" level of involvement with the mentally ill loved one while maintaining enough distance for personal health. Throughout the narratives, Karp sensitively explores the overarching question of how people strike an equilibrium between reason and emotion, between head and heart, when caring for a catastrophically ill person. The Burden of Sympathy concludes with a critical look at what it means to be a moral and caring person at the turn of the century in America, when powerful cultural messages spell out two contradictory imperatives: pursue personal fulfillment at any cost and care for the family at any cost. An insightful, deeply caring look at mental illness and at the larger picture of contemporary values, The Burden of Sympathy is required reading for caregivers of all kinds, and for anyone seeking broader understanding of human responsibility in the postmodern world.

  • The Burden of Sympathy: How Families Cope With Mental Illness

    The Burden of Sympathy: How Families Cope With Mental Illness
    David A. Karp

    What are the limits of sympathy in dealing with another person's troubles? Where do we draw the line between caring for a loved one, and being swallowed up emotionally by the obligation to do so? Quite simply, what do we owe each other? In this vivid and thoughtful study, David Karp chronicles the experiences of the family members of the mentally ill, and how they draw "boundaries of sympathy" to avoid being engulfed by the day-to-day suffering of a loved one. Working from sixty extensive interviews, the author reveals striking similarities in the experiences of caregivers: the feelings of shame, fear, guilt and powerlessness in the face of a socially stigmatized illness; the frustration of navigating the complex network of bureaucracies that govern the mental health system; and most of all, the difficulty negotiating an "appropriate" level of involvement with the mentally ill loved one while maintaining enough distance for personal health. Throughout the narratives, Karp sensitively explores the overarching question of how people strike an equilibrium between reason and emotion, between head and heart, when caring for a catastrophically ill person. The Burden of Sympathy concludes with a critical look at what it means to be a moral and caring person at the turn of the century in America, when powerful cultural messages spell out two contradictory imperatives: pursue personal fulfillment at any cost and care for the family at any cost. An insightful, deeply caring look at mental illness and at the larger picture of contemporary values, The Burden of Sympathy is required reading for caregivers of all kinds, and for anyone seeking broader understanding of human responsibility in the postmodern world.

  • The Fog of Paranoia: A Sister s Journey through Her Brother s Schizophrenia

    The Fog of Paranoia: A Sister’s Journey through Her Brother’s Schizophrenia
    Sarah Rae

    Pat and Sarah had long been friends, not just brother and sister. They supported each other, shared music and movies, and confided in each other as they went through the many challenging stages of adolescence. But something began to change in Pat. He was convinced people were watching him, spying on him. Once outgoing and sociable, he began to withdraw into a world of his own, on the inside, where social engagement was not necessary nor desired. He stopped taking care of his personal hygiene. Conversation became increasingly difficult. After a series of visits with psychologists, he was diagnosed at first with bi-polar disorder, and then, more accurately with schizophrenia with paranoid delusions. His world, and that of his sister’s, changed forever. This is the story of one sister’s fight to convince her family that her brother needed help, that initial efforts to curtail his symptoms were inadequate, that he needed additional intervention. At the same time, it is the story of her own struggles with anxiety and depression, and coping with the changes in her life as her brother suffered at home. And finally, it is the story of one family’s acceptance of a difficult diagnosis and their embracing of the child and brother they have always known and loved. Schizophrenia, indeed mental illness in general, is often misunderstood and therefore feared by society at large. Here, the author helps to dislodge some long-held assumptions about mental illness and encourages readers to ask questions, to offer help and support, and to advocate for assistance for anyone suffering mental illness before it’s too late. She offers a voice to all the sisters and brothers of the mentally ill, so that they may find comfort in her words and hope for their siblings.

  • Caring for Patients from Different Cultures: Edition 4

    Caring for Patients from Different Cultures: Edition 4
    Geri-Ann Galanti

    What happens when a Cherokee patient summons a medicine man to the hospital, or when an Anglo nurse refuses to take orders from a Japanese doctor? Why do Asian patients rarely ask for pain medication, while Mediterranean patients seem to seek relief for even the slightest discomfort?If the goal of the American medical system is to provide optimal care for all patients, healthcare providers must understand cultural differences that create conflicts and misunderstandings and can result in inferior medical care. Geri-Ann Galanti's updated classic, Caring for Patients from Different Cultures, is even more comprehensive than the first three editions, containing new appendices for quick reference, an expanded and updated bibliography with Internet resources, and a detailed index.Caring for Patients from Different Cultures contains more than 200 case studies illustrating crosscultural misunderstanding and culturally competent health care. The chapters cover a wide range of topics, including birth, end of life, traditional medicine, mental health, pain, religion, and multicultural staff issues. The case studies illustrate important concepts from the fields of cultural diversity and medical anthropology. This volume is an important resource for nurses and physicians in achieving cultural competency.

  • It s Enough to Make You Sick: The Failure of American Health Care and a Prescription for the Cure

    It’s Enough to Make You Sick: The Failure of American Health Care and a Prescription for the Cure
    Jeffrey M. Lobosky

    It's Enough to Make You Sick explains how the American health care system developed and how it has deteriorated into a national disgrace. Lobosky indicts the special interests who have played a role in the demise of American health care, examines the current attempts at reform, and offers a practical, compassionate blueprint for effective change.

  • Intellectual Disability: A Guide for Families and Professionals

    Intellectual Disability: A Guide for Families and Professionals
    James C. Harris, M.D.

    Approximately 2.5 million people in the United States–one percent of the population–have an intellectual disability (previously referred to as mental retardation). These conditions range from genetic disorders such as Down syndrome to disabilities caused by infectious diseases and brain injury. Intellectual Disability: A Guide for Families and Professionals, by one of the country's foremost authorities on intellectual disability, is a comprehensive resource that will be of importance to anyone with a personal connection to a child or adult with a neurodevelopmental disorder. Emphasizing the humanity of persons with intellectual and related developmental disabilities, psychiatrist and pediatrician James Harris provides essential information on assessment and diagnosis of intellectual disability, treatments for specific disorders, and ways to take advantage of the wide array of services available today. The focus throughout is on the development of the person, the positive supports necessary for self-determination, and, to the extent possible, independent decision making. Harris also surveys historical attitudes toward intellectual disability, the medical community's current understanding of its causes and frequency, and the associated physical, behavioral, and psychiatric conditions (such as seizure disorder, depression, and autism) that often accompany particular types of intellectual disability. The book addresses legal, medical, mental health, and research-related issues as well as matters of spirituality, highlighting the ways in which individuals with intellectual disability can meaningfully participate in the spiritual lives of their families and their communities. Each chapter ends with a series of key points to remember, and the book concludes with a list of additional resources of further interest. Intellectual Disability is a must-read for parents and families of those with neurodevelopmental disorders, providing guidance and essential information to help their family members effectively, and to make a significant, positive difference in their lives now and in the future.

  • Hospice Voices: Lessons for Living at the End of Life

    Hospice Voices: Lessons for Living at the End of Life
    Eric Lindner

    As a part-time hospice volunteer, Eric Lindner provides “companion care” to dying strangers. They’re chatterboxes and recluses, religious and irreligious; battered by cancer, congestive heart failure, Alzheimer’s, old age. Some cling to life amazingly. Most pass as they expected.In telling his story, Lindner reveals the thoughts, fears, and lessons of those living the ends of their lives in the care of others, having exhausted their medical options or ceased treatment for their illnesses. In each chapter, Lindner not only reveals the lessons of lives explored in their final days, but zeroes in on how working for hospice can be incredibly fulfilling. As he’s not a doctor, nurse, or professional social worker, just a volunteer lending a hand, offering a respite for other care providers, his charges often reveal more, and in more detail, to him than they do to those with whom they spend the majority of their time. They impart what they feel are life lessons as they reflect on their own lives and the prospect of their last days. Lindner captures it all in his lively storytelling. Anyone who knows or loves someone working through end of life issues, living in hospice or other end of life facilities, or dealing with terminal or chronic illnesses, will find in these pages the wisdom of those who are working through their own end of life issues, tackling life’s big questions, and boiling them down into lessons for anyone as they age or face illness. And those who may feel compelled to volunteer to serve as companions will find motivation, inspiration, and encouragement. Rather than sink under the weight of depression, pity, or sorrow, Lindner celebrates the lives of those who choose to live even as they die.

  • Critical Care: Delivering Spiritual Care in Healthcare Contexts

    Critical Care: Delivering Spiritual Care in Healthcare Contexts
    Peter Sedgwick

    Providing a bridge between research in healthcare and spirituality and practitioner perspectives, these essays on chaplaincy in healthcare continue dialogue around constructing, negotiating and researching spiritual care and discuss the critical issues in chaplaincy work, including assisted suicide and care in children's hospices. Each section of the book is introduced by an academic theologian, giving the book a strong theoretical base, before serving healthcare chaplains offer their perspectives and experiences with material drawn from practice in a broad spectrum of healthcare contexts. The integration of theory and practical application in these essays will be of interest to chaplains, healthcare practitioners, and students of theology and healthcare.

  • The Good Caregiver: A One-of-a-Kind Compassionate Resource for Anyone Caring for an Aging Loved One

    The Good Caregiver: A One-of-a-Kind Compassionate Resource for Anyone Caring for an Aging Loved One
    Robert L. Kane Dr.

    A survival guide with an insider's perspective, for the millions of unprepared caregivers of aging loved ones. As Americans are living longer, an unprecedented number of people now require long-term care during their last years. More than 15 million adult children now care for their elderly parents, and unsuspecting caregivers are usually unprepared financially, emotionally, and practically for the relentless job they will face. In The Good Caregiver, world-renowned expert on aging and long- term care Dr.Robert Kane provides a road map for caregiving. More than just a professional expert, Dr. Kane draws on his personal experience of caring for his aging mother after she struggled from a debilitating stroke. Dr. Kane offers heartfelt advice for those learning how to best care for their loved one and how to make thoughtful, informed decisions at each stage of the caring process: ? How does a nursing home differ from assisted living? ? How is a homemaker different from a home health aide? ? How far can you trust a hospital discharge planner? ? What services does Medicare cover, and much, much more The Good Caregiver equips readers to deal more effectively with the challenges of day-to-day care and to navigate the system itself, including legal, financial, and interpersonal hurdles. Filled with stories and sidebars from other caregivers, The Good Caregiver offers a candid, personal approach to caregiving, providing fearless answers to difficult scenarios with humor and encouragement.

  • Primary Health Care in Cuba: The Other Revolution

    Primary Health Care in Cuba: The Other Revolution
    Linda M. Whiteford

    As health care concerns grow in the U.S., medical anthropologist Linda M. Whiteford and social psychologist Larry G. Branch present their findings on a health care anomaly, from an unlikely source. Primary Health Care in Cuba examines the highly successful model of primary health care in Cuba following the 1959 Cuban Revolution. This model, developed during a time of dramatic social and political change, created a preventive care system to better provide equity access to health care. Cuba's recognition as a paragon of health care has earned praise from the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the Pan American Health Organization. In this book, Whiteford and Branch explore the successes of Cuba's preventive primary health care system and its contribution to global health.

  • Overcoming OCD: A Journey to Recovery

    Overcoming OCD: A Journey to Recovery
    Janet Singer

    Daniel Singer hadn’t eaten in a week. Hunched over with his head in his hands, he’d sit in his “safe” chair for hours, doing nothing but shaking, mumbling and moaning; he was in the throes of severe obsessive-compulsive disorder. Dan went from seven therapists to ten medications to a nine week stay at a world renowned residential treatment program. His parents worried he’d never again be able to function in society, or even worse, survive. Overcoming OCD: A Journey to Recovery is a mother’s account of the courage and perseverance of a young man who at times was hindered by the very people who were supposed to be helping him. It is a story of hope and the power of family, as well as a useful guide for all those whose lives have been touched by this often misunderstood and misrepresented disorder. Weaving expert commentary and useful information about OCD and its treatment throughout, the authors are able to offer not just a personal account of how the disorder can affect sufferers and families, but also a glimpse into the possibilities for diagnosis, clinical approaches, and successful outcomes. Today, thanks to Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) therapy, one of the available treatments for OCD, Dan is a college graduate working in his chosen field and living life to the fullest. He is living proof that even those with the most severe cases of OCD can not only recover, but triumph.

  • The Caregiver s Tao Te Ching: Compassionate Caring for Your Loved Ones and Yourself

    The Caregiver’s Tao Te Ching: Compassionate Caring for Your Loved Ones and Yourself
    William Martin

    Those who care for the ailing, whether helping someone recover, grapple with a long-term disability, or face a terminal illness, often feel alone, overwhelmed, exhausted. William and Nancy Martin have worked as counselors, hospice trainers, and Zen guides — and as caregivers to Nancy’s late mother. With empathy and insight, they offer readers solace drawn from the wisdom of the Tao Te Ching. Like the original Chinese text, this book contains eighty-one chapters. Each chapter includes a poem for caregivers, evocative of the verses of the Tao Te Ching, followed by a reflection that presents practical guidance for navigating the emotional and physical hardships of caregiving. The resulting resource gently awakens readers to the grace, growth, and even joy possible at each step along their path.

  • Creating Joy and Meaning for the Dementia Patient: A Caregiver s Guide to Connection and Hope

    Creating Joy and Meaning for the Dementia Patient: A Caregiver’s Guide to Connection and Hope
    Ronda Parsons

    According to recent estimates, more than five million Americans suffer from dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, a number predicted to grow as Baby Boomers continue to age. Although staggering, these statistics only tell half of the story. As caregivers are thrust into situations they never could have predicted, the emotional, physical, and financial strains are enormous and cannot be overestimated. As the number of dementia patients continues to increase, so will the number of caregivers searching for answers and advice.Creating Joy and Meaning for the Dementia Patient offers a positive and innovative approach to dementia care that focuses on the caregiver’s power to create an atmosphere of joy and peace for both the patient and themselves, breathing fresh air into the topic of dementia care. As the disease progresses, the patient’s world grows smaller and smaller. Time for them no longer consists of weeks, days, or even hours. Eventually their cognitive life is reduced to small increments of time, mere moments of memory. By understanding this and seeing the world through the eyes of a sufferer, the caregiver is better able to create an environment of mutual joy and contentment.Based on ten years of caregiving experience, the techniques offered here honor the patient’s individuality, interests, and previous accomplishments. This approach is fresh and inspirational, and recounts a personal journey, filled with relatable experiences that readers will find uplifting and brimming with hope. It teaches family members and other caregivers how to stay connected with their loved one for as long as possible. But most importantly, it honors the unique individual that still resides deep inside every dementia patient by offering techniques enabling them to continue to experience the simple joys of everyday life.

  • Faith and Mental Health: Religious Resources for Healing

    Faith and Mental Health: Religious Resources for Healing
    Harold G Koenig

    Dr. Harold Koenig is the brand in the growing field of spirituality and health. His groundbreaking research has been featured on national and international television and radio shows, on the covers of magazines, and in the headlines of newspapers.Now he opens a window on mental health, providing an unprecedented source of practical information about the relationship between religion mental health. Dr. Koenig examines how Christianity and other world religions deliver mental health services today, and he makes recommendations, based on research, expertise, and experience, for new programs to meet local needs.Meticulously researched and documented, Faith and Mental Health includes: Research on the relationship between religion and positive emotions, psychiatric illnesses, and severe and persistent mental disorders Ways in which religion has influenced mental health historically, and how now and in the future it can be involved with mental health A comprehensive description and categorization of Christian and non-Christian faith-based organizations that provide mental health resources Resources for religious professionals and faith communities on how to design effective programsPresenting a combination of the history and current research of mental health and religion along with a thorough examination of faith-based organizations operating in the field, this book is a one-of-a-kind resource for the health care community; its valuable research and insights will benefit medical and religious professionals, and anyone concerned with the future of mental health care.

  • Depression and Your Child: A Guide for Parents and Caregivers

    Depression and Your Child: A Guide for Parents and Caregivers
    Deborah Serani

    Seeing your child suffer in any way is a harrowing experience for any parent. Mental illness in children can be particularly draining due to the mystery surrounding it, and the issue of diagnosis at such a tender age. Depression and Your Child gives parents and caregivers a uniquely textured understanding of pediatric depression, its causes, its symptoms, and its treatments. Serani weaves her own personal experiences of being a depressed child along with her clinical experiences as a psychologist treating depressed children. Current research, treatments and trends are presented in easy to understand language and tough subjects like self-harm, suicide and recovery plans are addressed with supportive direction. Parents will learn tips on how to discipline a depressed child, what to expect from traditional treatments like psychotherapy and medication, how to use holistic methods to address depression, how to avoid caregiver burnout, and how to move through the trauma of diagnosis and plan for the future. Real life cases highlight the issues addressed in each chapter and resources and a glossary help to further understanding for those seeking additional information. Parents and caregivers are sure to find here a reassuring approach to childhood depression that highlights the needs of the child even while it emphasizes the need for caregivers to care for themselves and other family members as well.

  • Reconstructing Illness: Studies in Pathography, Volume 393

    Reconstructing Illness: Studies in Pathography, Volume 393
    Anne Hunsaker Hawkins

    Serious illness and mortality, those most universal, unavoidable, and frightening of human experiences, are the focus of this pioneering study which has been hailed as a telling and provocative commentary on our times. As modern medicine has become more scientific and dispassionate, a new literary genre has emerged: pathography, the personal narrative concerning illness, treatment, and sometimes death. Hawkins's sensitive reading of numerous pathographies highlights the assumptions, attitudes, and myths that people bring to the medical encounter. One factor emerges again and again in these case studies: the tendency in contemporary medical practice to focus primarily not on the needs of the individual who is sick but on the condition that we call disease. Pathography allows the individual person a voice – one that asserts the importance of the experiential side of illness, and thus restores the feeling, thinking, experiencing human being to the center of the medical enterprise. Recommended for medical practitioners, the clergy, caregivers, students of popular culture, and the general reader, Reconstructing Illness demonstrates that only when we hear both the doctor's and the patient's voice will we have a medicine that is truly human.

  • When Life Becomes Precious: The Essential Guide for Patients, Loved Ones, and Friends of Those Facing Seriou s Illnesses

    When Life Becomes Precious: The Essential Guide for Patients, Loved Ones, and Friends of Those Facing Seriou s Illnesses
    Elise NeeDell Babcock

    When you hear that someone you love has cancer…You want to be as supportive as possible. But how? Elise NeeDell Babcock has devoted her life to answering this question and now puts her twenty-three years of experience as a counselor into this immensely useful guide. When Life Becomes Precious contains hundreds of tips for helping patients, primary caregivers, co-workers, and family members, including: What to say (and not to say) to someone when you first find out they have cancer• How to be supportive without being intrusive• How to build a winning health-care team• How to handle holidays, birthdays, and anniversaries• How to explain the disease to children• Which gifts and gestures can do the most good From techniques for handling anger and anxiety, to uplifting success stories, to a comprehensive resource section, here is the information and inspiration you need to help those you love and to make each day–each moment–more precious.When Life Becomes Precious will be the first book to: • Offer tips on ways to help patients, caregivers and co-workers• Provide a long and diverse list of gifts that are appropriate to give to families that are living with cancer• Offers reasons why fear makes people shy away from discussing cancer and techniques on how to overcome that fear• Present the things that families do that doctors like and dislikeWhen Life Becomes Precious will teach readers to assess and put into perspective, their own feelings about the disease so that they can truly help those who are afflicted with it. The use of cartoons, anecdotes and personal stories will set an upbeat and positive tone. Readers will come away fully prepared to deal with the realities of cancer.

  • Learning from My Daughter: The Value and Care of Disabled Minds

    Learning from My Daughter: The Value and Care of Disabled Minds
    Eva Feder Kittay

    Does life have meaning? What is flourishing? How do we attain the good life? Philosophers, and many others of us, have explored these questions for centuries. As Eva Feder Kittay points out, however, there is a flaw in the essential premise of these questions: they seem oblivious to the very nature of the ways in which humans live, omitting a world of co-dependency, and of the fact that we live in and through our bodies, whether they are fully abled or disabled. Our dependent, vulnerable, messy, changeable, and embodied experience colors everything about our lives both on the surface and when it comes to deeper concepts, but we tend to leave aside the body for the mind when it comes to philosophical matters. Disability offers a powerful challenge to long-held philosophical views about the nature of the good life, what provides meaning in our lives, and the centrality of reason, as well as questions of justice, dignity, and personhood. These concepts need not be distant and idealized; the answers are right before us, in the way humans interact with one another, care for one another, and need one another–whether they possess full mental capacities or have cognitive limitations. We need to revise our concepts of things like dignity and personhood in light of this important correction, Kittay argues. This is the first of two books in which Kittay will grapple with just how we need to revisit core philosophical ideas in light of disabled people's experience and way of being in the world. Kittay, an award-winning philosopher who is also the mother to a multiply-disabled daughter, interweaves the personal voice with the philosophical as a critical method of philosophical investigation. Here, she addresses why cognitive disability can reorient us to what truly matters, and questions the centrality of normalcy as part of a good life. With profound sensitivity and insight, Kittay examines other difficult topics: How can we look at the ethical questions regarding prenatal testing in light of a new appreciation of the personhood of disabled people? What do new possibilities in genetic testing imply for understanding disability, the family, and bioethics? How can we reconsider the importance of care, and how does it work best? In the process of pursuing these questions, Kittay articulates an ethic of care, which is the ethical theory most useful for claiming full rights for disabled people and providing the opportunities for everyone to live joyful and fulfilling lives. She applies the lessons of care to the controversial alteration of severely cognitively disabled children known as the Ashley Treatment, whereby a child's growth is halted with extensive estrogen treatment and related bodily interventions are justified. This book both imparts lessons that advocate on behalf of those with significant disabilities, and constructs a moral theory grounded on our ability to give, receive, and share care and love. Above all, it aims to adjust social attitudes and misconceptions about life with disability.

  • How to Be a Friend to a Friend Who s Sick

    How to Be a Friend to a Friend Who’s Sick
    Letty Cottin Pogrebin

    Everyone knows someone who's sick or suffering. Yet when a friend or relative is under duress many of us feel uncertain about how to cope.Throughout her recent bout with breast cancer, Letty Cottin Pogrebin became fascinated by her friends' and family's diverse reactions to her and her illness: how awkwardly some of them behaved; how some misspoke or misinterpreted her needs; and how wonderful it was when people read her right. She began talking to her fellow patients and dozens of other veterans of serious illness, seeking to discover what sick people wished their friends knew about how best to comfort, help, and even simply talk to them.Now Pogrebin has distilled their collective stories and opinions into this wide-ranging compendium of pragmatic guidance and usable wisdom. Her advice is always infused with sensitivity, warmth, and humor. It is embedded in candid stories from her own and others' journeys, and their sometimes imperfect interactions with well-meaning friends. How to Be a Friend to a Friend Who's Sick is an invaluable guidebook for anyone hoping to rise to the challenges of this most important and demanding passage of friendship.

  • The Mindful Caregiver: Finding Ease in the Caregiving Journey

    The Mindful Caregiver: Finding Ease in the Caregiving Journey
    Nancy L. Kriseman

    Caregiving can be enormously challenging, terrifically rewarding, and potentially draining. Caregivers often wonder how they will navigate the tumultuous waters of caregiving and not lose themselves completely. The Mindful Caregiver highlights two major approaches to help transform the journey: adopting a practice of mindfulness, which helps caregivers become more self-aware and fully present with the person with whom they are caring, and honoring “the spirit-side” of caregiving which offers new ways of connecting to one another. These approaches take into account not just the needs of the care recipient, but also the needs of the caregiver and other people in his/her life. Remembering to care for oneself when someone else is in great need can be difficult, but with the suggestions and tips in this book, any caregiver can cultivate routines and practices that benefit everyone. Solutions that caregivers can use in their day to day routines are provided, so caregivers who use them can feel more empowered and hopeful. Using real stories throughout, Nancy Kriseman offers self-care exercises and addresses a wide variety of subjects such as setting realistic expectations, making the best possible decisions, advocating effectively, and evaluating available resources and services. The Mindful Caregiver provides inspiration, encouragement, and guidance for finding ease in the caregiving journey. By emphasizing both mindfulness and the spiritual dimension, caregivers can reap the gifts of caregiving, appreciate the special moments, and find strength during the challenging times.

  • Interpersonal Relationships - E-Book: Professional Communication Skills for Nurses, Edition 6

    Interpersonal Relationships – E-Book: Professional Communication Skills for Nurses, Edition 6
    Elizabeth C. Arnold

    Acclaimed for its strong theoretical framework and consistent organization, Arnold and Boggs' Interpersonal Relationships: Professional Communication Skills for Nurses, 6th Edition, remains the definitive resource in developing effective communication with clients, families, and colleagues in order to achieve treatment goals in health care. This two-time AJN Book of the Year award-winner is thoroughly updated and includes current references describing how to modify communications strategies for various populations and situations including children, the elderly, end of life, health teaching, stress, crisis, and colleagues. Two new chapters address issues in contemporary health care related to promoting health safety and supporting continuity of care. Not only does this book present proven communications strategies and principles in nursing, psychology, and related theoretical frameworks, but also it challenges you to apply these strategies and principles to numerous exercises and practical nursing case studies. Written in terms of the nurse-client relationship, the cutting-edge communications strategies presented are key for nursing students and professional nurses. Covers all mandated topics for nursing professionals, from beginning students to staff development in a variety of settings, including professional collaboration, health team communication, patient-centered care, safety, and hand-off communication. Discusses nursing, behavioral, developmental, family, and communication theories, providing an essential foundation and a theoretical perspective of effective communication. Offers basic concepts first, followed by applications with emphasis on assessment, providing a sound framework as you prepare for nurse-client interactions. Experiential exercises offer the opportunity to practice, observe and critically evaluate your professional communication skills in a safe learning environment. Critical Thinking Exercises promote critical thinking processes essential for effective communication in nursing practice. Includes case examples throughout, creating empathy for clients' perspectives and needs. Offers Ethical Dilemma and Developing an Evidence-Based Practice boxes in each chapter. Describes how best to use the electronic health record for clear communication with current information on classification systems, standards of documentation, and telehealth technologies used in nursing. Acknowledges humor, gender, and touch as important means of communication in interpersonal relationships. Increases awareness of the issues involved in communicating with individuals of various stages of life, clients with special needs, and colleagues in all areas of health care. Provides learning objectives, chapter overviews, and a detailed glossary — all designed to focus your learning and help you organize key content.

  • Caring for Patients from Different Cultures: Edition 5

    Caring for Patients from Different Cultures: Edition 5
    Geri-Ann Galanti

    Healthcare providers in the American medical system may find that patients from different cultures bring unfamiliar expectations, anxieties, and needs into the examination room. To provide optimal care for all patients, it is important to see differences from the patient's perspective and to work with patients from a range of demographics. Caring for Patients from Different Cultures has been a vital resource for nurses and physicians for more than twenty years, offering hundreds of case studies that illustrate crosscultural conflicts or misunderstandings as well as examples of culturally competent health care.Now in its fifth edition, Caring for Patients from Different Cultures covers a wide range of topics, including birth, end of life, communication, traditional medicine, mental health, pain, religion, and multicultural staff challenges. This edition includes more than sixty new cases with an expanded appendix, introduces a new chapter on improving adherence, and updates the concluding chapter with examples of changes various hospitals have made to accommodate cultural differences. Grounded in concepts from the fields of cultural diversity and medical anthropology, Caring for Patients from Different Cultures provides healthcare workers with a frame of reference for understanding cultural differences and sound alternatives for providing the best possible care to multicultural communities.

  • Care of the Dying Patient

    Care of the Dying Patient
    David A. Fleming

    Although the need for improved care for dying patients is widely recognized and frequently discussed, few books address the needs of the physicians, nurses, social workers, therapists, hospice team members, and pastoral counselors involved in care. Care of the Dying Patient contains material not found in other sources, offering advice and solutions to anyone—professional caregiver or family member—confronted with incurable illness and death. Its authors have lectured and published extensively on care of the dying patient and here review a wide range of topics to show that relief of physical suffering is not the only concern in providing care. This collection encompasses diverse aspects of end-of-life care across multiple disciplines, offering a broad perspective on such central issues as control of pain and other symptoms, spirituality, the needs of caregivers, and special concerns regarding the elderly. In its pages, readers will find out how to: effectively utilize palliative-care services and activate timely referral to hospice, arrange for care that takes into account patients’ cultural beliefs, and respond to spiritual and psychological distress, including the loss of hope that often overshadows physical suffering. The authors especially emphasize palliative care and hospice, since some physicians fear that such referrals may be viewed by patients and families as abandonment. They also address ethical and legal risks in pain management and warn that fear of overprescribing pain medication may inadvertently lead to ineffective pain relief and even place the treating team at risk of liability for undertreatment of pain. While physicians have the ability to treat disease, they also help to determine the time and place of death, and they must recognize that end-of-life choices are made more complex than ever before by advances in medicine and at the same time increasingly important. Care of the Dying Patient addresses some of the challenges frequently confronted in terminal care and points the way toward a more compassionate way of death.

  • Transplanting Care: Shifting Commitments in Health and Care in the United States

    Transplanting Care: Shifting Commitments in Health and Care in the United States
    Laura L. Heinemann

    The sudden call, the race to the hospital, the high-stakes operation—the drama of transplant surgery is well known. But what happens before and after the surgery? In Transplanting Care, Laura L. Heinemann examines the daily lives of midwestern organ transplant patients and those who care for them, from pretransplant preparations through to the long posttransplant recovery. Heinemann points out that as efforts to control healthcare costs gain urgency—and as new surgical techniques, drug therapies, and home medical equipment advance—most of the transplant process now takes place at home, among kin. Indeed, the transplant system effectively depends on unpaid care labor, typically provided by spouses, parents, siblings, and others. Drawing on scores of interviews with patients, relatives, and healthcare professionals, Heinemann follows a variety of patients and loved ones as they undertake this uncertain and strenuous “transplant journey.” She also shows how these home-based caregiving efforts take place within the larger economic and political context of a paucity of resources for patients and caregivers, who ultimately must surmount numerous obstacles. The author concludes that the many snags encountered by transplant patients and loved ones make a clear case for more comprehensive health and social policy that treats care as a necessarily shared public responsibility. An illuminating look at the long transplant journey, Transplanting Care also offers broader insight into how we handle infirmity in America—and how we might do a better job of doing so.

  • Mummy’s Little Helper: The heartrending true story of a young girl secretly caring for her severely disabled mother

    Mummy’s Little Helper: The heartrending true story of a young girl secretly caring for her severely disabled mother
    Casey Watson

    The fifth book from bestselling author and specialist foster carer Casey Watson. A recent census shows that there are at least 175,000 child carers in the UK, 13,000 of whom care for more than 50 hours a week. Many remain invisible to a system that would otherwise help them. Abigail is one of those children. This is her story. Ten-year-old Abigail has never known her father. Her mother, Sarah, has multiple sclerosis, and Abigail has been her carer since she was a toddler – shopping, cooking, cleaning and attending to her personal needs. When Sarah is rushed to hospital, suddenly this comes to the attention of the social services, and Abigail has nowhere to go. Though she doesn’t fit the usual profile of a child that specialist foster carers Casey and Mike Watson would take on, they are happy to step in and look after Abigail. It’s an emergency, after all – and all that’s needed is a loving temporary home, while social services look into how to support the family so that they can be reunited. But it soon becomes clear that this isn’t going to happen. Sarah’s MS is now at a very advanced stage, and the doctors are certain that there will no longer be periods of remission. Abigail’s emotional state starts to spiral out of control as she struggles to let go of the burden of responsibilities she has carried for so long. Sarah and Abigail insist that they do not need help, but with no other family to contact, social services are left with no choice but to find long-term care for Abigail, against their wishes. But Casey never gives up on a child in need, and she knows there must be another solution… Includes a sample chapter of Sunday Times bestseller Trafficked.

  • Parkinson s Disease and the Family

    Parkinson’s Disease and the Family
    Nutan Sharma

    Too often, with Parkinson's disease, a loved one serves as medical interpreter, patient advocate, and caregiver. Sharma and Richman draw on the latest research and clinical practice techniques to offer valuable suggestions for managing patient care and, perhaps more important, for healing the family unit.

  • Meet Me Where I Am: An Alzheimer s Care Guide

    Meet Me Where I Am: An Alzheimer’s Care Guide
    Mary Ann Drummond

    Me Where I Am provides knowledge and essential tools to lovingly, confidently and, above all, successfully care for those who live with Alzheimer’s and related dementias. Over 5 million Americans currently live with Alzheimer’s disease. Along with them, 15 million unpaid caregivers seek knowledge and resources to assist them in the journey. The unique care principles found in Meet Me Where I Am help mitigate depression, decrease anxiety, and allow for successful relationships as long as possible in the dementia journey. Mary Ann Drummond, RN credits her unique care philosophy to the greatest teachers of all—the many individuals living with Alzheimer’s and related dementias she has had the pleasure of caring for over the years. Imbuing practical tips with wisdom, respect, and sensibility, Drummond comes full circle by sharing what happened when her own mentor fell prey to the disease. Meet Me Where I Am is a road map that teaches caregivers how to focus on the possibilities, discover the joy in the journey, and prepare for the road ahead.

  • Understanding Parkinson s Disease: An Introduction for Patients and Caregivers

    Understanding Parkinson’s Disease: An Introduction for Patients and Caregivers
    Naheed Ali

    Parkinson’s disease is a degenerative neurological disease characterized primarily by cognitive deficiencies and problems with muscle movements and tremors; more than a half a million Americans have the disease and the current numbers are expected to increase over the next few years. Understanding Parkinson’s Disease offers patients and their caregivers the kind of cutting-edge information that will allow them to successfully confront this debilitating disease on a number of fronts. Dr. Naheed Ali provides patients with a hopeful perspective as well as practical ways of confronting and living with the disease. Patients will also be uniquely exposed to alternative approaches to managing the symptoms of the disease, including allopathic, osteopathic, and naturopathic approaches. While Understanding Parkinson’s Disease also provides powerful techniques and real-world advice that sufferers can immediately put into practice, the book also encourages readers to gain a full understanding of the background of the disease.Dr. Ali presents contemporary benchmark concepts and gives detailed advice that makes dealing with Parkinson’s a much simpler and easier undertaking. The reader will be introduced to essential information on the risk factors associated with Parkinson’s, the signs and symptoms, the different stages of the disease, the various treatments, as well as how the disease develops. Anyone looking for an introduction to both the science behind Parkinson’s and the effects of its course on sufferers, as well as information about treatment and real life strategies for dealing with the debilitating symptoms, will find the information they need in this accessible resource.

  • The Theft of Memory: Losing My Father, One Day at a Time

    The Theft of Memory: Losing My Father, One Day at a Time
    Jonathan Kozol

    A Library Journal Best Book of 2015National Book Award winner Jonathan Kozol is best known for his fifty years of work among our nation’s poorest and most vulnerable children. Now, in the most personal book of his career, he tells the story of his father’s life and work as a nationally noted specialist in disorders of the brain and his astonishing ability, at the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, to explain the causes of his sickness and then to narrate, step-by-step, his slow descent into dementia. Dr. Harry Kozol was born in Boston in 1906. Classically trained at Harvard and Johns Hopkins, he was an unusually intuitive clinician with a special gift for diagnosing interwoven elements of neurological and psychiatric illnesses in highly complicated and creative people. “One of the most intense relationships of his career,” his son recalls, “was with Eugene O’Neill, who moved to Boston in the last years of his life so my father could examine him and talk with him almost every day.” At a later stage in his career, he evaluated criminal defendants including Patricia Hearst and the Boston Strangler, Albert H. DeSalvo, who described to him in detail what was going through his mind while he was killing thirteen women. But The Theft of Memory is not primarily about a doctor’s public life. The heart of the book lies in the bond between a father and his son and the ways that bond intensified even as Harry’s verbal skills and cogency progressively abandoned him. “Somehow,” the author says, “all those hours that we spent trying to fathom something that he wanted to express, or summon up a vivid piece of seemingly lost memory that still brought a smile to his eyes, left me with a deeper sense of intimate connection with my father than I’d ever felt before.” Lyrical and stirring, The Theft of Memory is at once a tender tribute to a father from his son and a richly colored portrait of a devoted doctor who lived more than a century.

  • Burnout: The Cost of Caring

    Burnout: The Cost of Caring
    Christina Maslach

    This book shows how to recognize, prevent and cure burnout syndrome for nurses, teachers, counselors, doctors, therapists, police, social workers, and anyone else who cares about and for people. Christina Maslach, the leading pioneer in research on burnout, offers help using illustrative examples and first-hand accounts. She points out what causes the feelings of emotional exhaustion, the callous indifference to people's problems, and the sense of inadequacy about one's ability to help and relate to others.

  • Keeping Busy: A Handbook of Activities for Persons with Dementia

    Keeping Busy: A Handbook of Activities for Persons with Dementia
    James R. Dowling

    Although very little can be done to alter the course of dementia, much can be done to maximize the quality of life of people with the condition. Research as well as practical experience suggest that behavior management, especially through programs that provide meaningful and constructive activity, is currently the most effective treatment.In Keeping Busy, James Dowling describes a variety of activities designed to bring meaning and enjoyment to the lives of persons with dementia. The activities are organized by general categories such as music, exercise, horticulture, pets, humor, and social events. The largest section deals with communication and includes word games that help people strengthen their remaining verbal skills. The description of each activity includes step-by-step instructions, as well as tips on how to adapt it for small or large groups, for individuals at home or in an organization, or people who are bedridden.

  • Spirituality in Patient Care: Why, How, When, and What

    Spirituality in Patient Care: Why, How, When, and What
    Harold G. Koenig

    Praise for the previous edition: “I highly recommend this book as reading for all physicians and would certainly recommend it for any course on medical ethics and/or required reading for any medical student.”—Journal of the National Medical Association Since the publication of the first edition of Spirituality in Patient Care in 2002, the book has earned a reputation as the authoritative introduction to the subject for health professionals interested in identifying and addressing the spiritual needs of patients. The body of research on religion, spirituality, and health continues to grow at a dramatic rate, creating an urgent need for a new edition of this landmark work. In this, the third edition, Harold G. Koenig, M.D., updates every chapter by incorporating the newest research and introducing sensible ways of translating that research into caring for patients. Like previous editions, this new one addresses the whys, hows, whens, and whats of patient-centered integration of spirituality into patient care so that health professionals, including physicians in primary care and the medical and surgical specialties, can utilize this information in clinical practice. Whole chapters are also included offering profession-specific information for nurses, clergy, mental health professionals, social workers, and occupational and physical therapists. Other chapters address topics like culturally and spiritually sensitive care for each major religious group, potential limitations or barriers to application, and even what may happen when research on spirituality and health is misapplied. Throughout these chapters, readers will find new case histories and clinical examples on how to integrate spirituality into patient care depending on their particular circumstances. A ten-session model course curriculum on spirituality and health care for medical students and residents is also provided, with suggestions on how to adapt it for nursing, social work, physical and occupational therapy, and mental health training programs. For more than ten years Spirituality in Patient Care has offered sound guidance to anyone wishing to do more than simply treat their patients’ physical symptoms. Treating the whole patient often requires becoming something more than just a skilled technician. With this new edition, Dr. Koenig once again shows the way for any health professional seeking to bridge this gap and help patientsregain their lives by finding hope, meaning, and healing.

  • Medical Care of Cancer Patients

    Medical Care of Cancer Patients
    Sai-Ching Jim Yeung

    Recent therapeutic advances in cancer treatment indicate that cancer is becoming a chronic disease rather than a killer. This comprehensive text is the first to define and address the broad spectrum of acute and chronic internal medicine disorders that occur in cancer patients and cancer survivors as side-effects of the disease itself, or of the treatment regimens. The authors cover nononcologic aspects of internal medicine such as anorexia, obesity, bone loss, diabetes, depression, pain, fatigue, congestive heart failure, skin disorders, and pneumonia. This book is conceived as a companion to standard internal medicine and oncology texts – a comprehensive reference resource for internists caring for cancer patients and oncologists in practice. The text is extensively indexed for easy access and retrieval of information.

  • Help Me Live, Revised: 20 Things People with Cancer Want You to Know

    Help Me Live, Revised: 20 Things People with Cancer Want You to Know
    Lori Hope

    Almost all of us know someone with cancer. And, of course, we want nothing more than to offer comfort and support, and foster hope. But we don’t always know how—and may feel uncomfortable asking. Following her own treatment for cancer, Lori Hope created a survey for cancer survivors addressing issues they wanted their families, friends, and caregivers to understand. The results of the newly expanded survey are presented with honesty, insight, and humor, and complemented by scores of compelling personal stories from survivors of diverse ages and backgrounds. If you are a caregiver, Help Me Live will help you communicate more effectively and respond more compassionately. And if you are a survivor, it will help you feel validated, empowered, and, ultimately, hopeful.

  • An Iceberg in Paradise: A Passage through Alzheimer’s

    An Iceberg in Paradise: A Passage through Alzheimer’s
    Nancy Avery Dafoe

    Offers a healing and insightful examination of the issues involved in Alzheimer’s for family and caregivers.In this evocative memoir, Nancy Avery Dafoe shares the heart-wrenching experience of caring for her ailing mother as she struggled, and ultimately lost her battle, with Alzheimer’s disease. Weaving poetry throughout, Dafoe tells her family’s story in the hope of helping those who are navigating the murky waters of Alzheimer’s. She presents different approaches and practical advice for dealing with the difficult life transition that occurs when parents become ill. At its center, An Iceberg in Paradise is not only a tribute to love in the face of loss but also an exploration of memory, our human connections, and holding on until there is nothing left to hold.“Beautifully written, An Iceberg in Paradise expresses Nancy Avery Dafoe’s very personal experience as a family member observing the slow yet relentless failing of her beloved mother. I loved Dafoe’s honest way of writing about the pain, confusion, anger, frustration, and sorrow of her journey with her mother and her mother’s ‘passage.’ This is a personal, very human memoir that anyone dealing with Alzheimer’s in a parent or spouse would find helpful and supportive.” — Alison Jacob, LCSW“I found this book particularly touching on many levels. As we baby boomers age and our parents are living longer in general, we all need information and to hear others’ stories of their experiences with this as it could well affect many of us on a very personal level.” — Mark Marshall, LCSW

  • Spiritual Care in Practice: Case Studies in Healthcare Chaplaincy

    Spiritual Care in Practice: Case Studies in Healthcare Chaplaincy
    George Fitchett

    These diverse case studies make a compelling case for the importance of effective spiritual care in healthcare and provide unprecedented insight into the essential role of the chaplain within the healthcare team. Presented alongside critical reflections and responses from professionals within chaplaincy, psychology, psychiatry and nursing, they provide an honest and detailed look into how healthcare chaplains actually work with the people in their care and reveal the vital role of narrative and imagination in effective transformative practice. From a 16-year-old with a belief that God would enable a miraculous recovery from paralysis, to an African man with a history of psychosis and depression whose cultural belief in witches complicated his treatment, to a dying Jewish man, aggressive and isolated due to his traumatic life experiences, each case includes insight into the patient's needs and chaplain's perspectives, discussion of spiritual assessments and spiritual care interventions, and accounts of significant encounters and dialogues. The nine paediatric, psychiatric and palliative case studies and reflections in this ground-breaking book will enable chaplains to critically reflect on the spiritual care they provide and communicate their work more effectively, help healthcare professionals develop a clearer understanding of the care chaplains deliver, and provide an informed perspective for those who develop policy around spiritual care and need to make the case for chaplaincy services.